Climate Science

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Ocean Acidification

Since the Industrial Revolution, the acidity of the world’s oceans has increased significantly. This change is entirely the result of human activities. About one third of all the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by human activities has been absorbed by the …

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Key Scientific Developments Since the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released its Fourth Assessment Report in 2007, summarizing the scientific community’s current understanding of the science of climate change.  Since that time, a number of new scientific results have been published that expand …

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Article
Climate Change Risks in the Context of Scientific Uncertainty

This article appeared in The Global Politics of Energy, 2008.

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The Science of Climate Change: Global and U.S. Perspectives

Basic Science on climate change: Projections of future climate change suggest a global temperature increase of 1 to 6°C (2 to 10°F) from 1990 to 2100, with warming in most of the United States expected to be even higher. Current …

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Forests & Global Climate Change

One-third of U.S. lands are covered by forests, which makes forest ecosystems prominent natural resources that contribute to biodiversity, water quality, carbon storage, and recreation. Forests also play a significant role in the U.S. economy, and forestry or forestry-related enterprises …

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Multi-Gas Contributors to Global Climate Change

In the effort to understand and address global climate change, most analysis has focused on rapidly rising emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and options for reducing them. Indeed, carbon dioxide, a byproduct of fossil fuel combustion, is the principal greenhouse …

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Ecosystems and Global Climate Change

Natural ecosystems are one of our most precious resources, critical for sustaining life on the planet. The benefits humans derive from ecosystems are varied, from marketable products such as pharmaceuticals, to recreational opportunities such as camping, to ecosystems services such …

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