Washington Should Note the Success of the Other Washington

COPENHAGEN - Governor Chris Gregoire made a presentation about the successes of Washington state in building a clean energy economy at an official COP 15 side event hosted by us and the World Business Council on Sustainable Development.  A packed room listened to how the experience of the Washington out West should provide insight for national policymakers of the Washington in the East.

She detailed how, given an appropriate state policy framework, the private sector has made significant innovations in technology, making Washington a national leader in solar manufacturing and the state with the 5th most wind energy production. All of this development occurred despite the fact that the state does not have large wind or solar energy resources.  The lesson here is that the innovativeness and drive of American business should never be underestimated, and there is nationwide potential for growth in a clean energy technology.  New and existing American companies will find ways to flourish given the right incentives.

The Governor also spoke about states leading the way in implementing cap-and-trade programs to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.    She pointed out that a multistate and multi-Canadian province effort, the Western Climate Initiative, is underway to enact a cap-and-trade program covering 20% of the US economy - despite the delays in development of a national program.  The WCI is the not the only state-level effort underway, with the Midwestern Greenhouse Reduction Accord signed in 2007.  Both of these efforts follow on the heels of an ongoing cap-and-trade program in the Northeast, which, as Gregoire pointed out, has proven that cap-and-trade programs can tackle greenhouse gas emissions without damaging the American economy – an important piece of empirical evidence as the nation and the world look towards developing emissions-reduction policy.

Of course, the government cannot do it alone.  The people in Washington state have a commitment to technology, whether it’s aerospace, software, clean energy, or coffee.  Now its time for legislators in Washington, DC to show the same commitment to technology promotion and emission reduction.

Michael Tubman is the Congressional Affairs Fellow