Legislation in the 107th Congress Related to Global Climate Change

During the 107th Congress (2001-2002), nearly 70 bills, resolutions, and amendments specifically addressing global climate change and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions were introduced. The proposals ranged from GHG emission limits to carbon sequestration. Additional measures focused on decreasing America's dependency on foreign oil by increasing the use of renewable energy resources.

The bills, resolutions, and amendments specifically addressing global climate change and GHG emissions introduced in the 107th Congress are listed here in the following categories:

Full list of Bills:

GHG Emission Limits

S.556: The Clean Power Act, which requires reductions of CO2, SO2, NOX, and mercury emissions from electric powerplants. CO2 emissions are reduced to 1990 levels by 2008 (as reported by committee). Sponsor: Sen. James M. Jeffords (I-VT) (22 cosponsors) - Action: 6/27/2002 Reported favorably by the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee with an amendment in the nature of a substitute by a vote of 10 - 9.

S.1131: The Clean Power Plant and Modernization Act, which requires reductions of CO2, SO2, NOX, and mercury emissions from electric powerplants.
Sponsor: Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-VT)

S.3135: The Clean Air Planning Act, which requires reductions of CO2, SO2, NOX, and mercury emissions from electric powerplants. CO2 emissions are stabilized at 2005 levels by 2008 and reduced to 2001 levels by 2012.
Sponsor: Sen. Thomas R. Carper (D-DE) (3 cosponsors)

H.R.1256: The Clean Smokestacks Act, which requires reductions of CO2, SO2, NOX, and mercury emissions from electric powerplants. CO2 emissions are reduced to 1990 levels by 2007.(House companion of S.556.)
Sponsor: Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-CA) (133 cosponsors)

H.R.1335: The Clean Power Plant Act, which requires reductions of CO2, SO2, NOX, and mercury emissions from electric powerplants.
Sponsor: Rep. Thomas H. Allen (D-ME) (22 cosponsors)

H.R.2116: The Great Smoky Mountains Clean Air Act, which requires reductions of CO2, SO2, NOX, and mercury emissions from Tennessee Valley Authority electric powerplants.
Sponsor: Rep. Charles H. Taylor (R-NC) (2 cosponsors)

H.Res.117: A House resolution which expresses the sense of Congress that the United States should develop, promote, and implement policies to reduce emissions of fossil fuel generated carbon dioxide with the goal of achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States at the 1990 level by the year 2010.
Sponsor: Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA) (66 cosponsors)

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GHG Emission Reporting

S.1333: The Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Investment Act of 2001, which, among other things, requires electricity generators to disclose their carbon dioxide emissions to potential consumers.
Sponsor: Sen. James M. Jeffords (I-VT) (5 cosponsors)

S.1716: The Global Climate Change Act of 2001, which, among other things, establishes a mandatory greenhouse gas reporting and disclosure program.
Sponsor: Sen. John F. Kerry (D-MA) (4 cosponsors)

S.1766: The Energy Policy Act of 2002, which, as part of a comprehensive energy bill, establishes a mandatory greenhouse gas reporting and disclosure program. (Also includes the main provisions of S.1008, which requires development of a U.S. Climate Change Response Strategy.)
Sponsor: Sen. Thomas A. Daschle (D-SD) (6 cosponsors)

S.1781: The Emission Reductions Incentive Act of 2001, which establishes a voluntary registry of greenhouse gas emissions reductions.
Sponsor: Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) (1 cosponsor)

S.1870: A bill to amend the Clean Air Act to establish an inventory, registry, and information system of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to inform the public and private sector concerning, and encourage voluntary reductions in, greenhouse emissions.
Sponsor: Sen. Jon Corzine (D-NJ) (2 cosponsors)

S.2815: The Clear Skies Act, which requires reductions of SO2, NOX, and mercury emissions from electric powerplants, but not of CO2 emissions. Would exempt certain powerplants from the existing requirement that powerplants report their CO2 emissions.
Sponsor: Sen. Bob Smith (R-NH) (by request of the Bush Administration)

S.Amdt.2917 to S.517: The Energy Policy Act of 2002, which includes Title X, establishing a National Climate Change Policy (see S.1008 under National Climate Change Strategy) and expressing the Sense of the Congress on international climate change negotations (see S.1401 under International Climate Change Negotiations), Title XI, establishing a National Greenhouse Gas Registry (see S.Amdt.3239 under Greenhouse Gas Reporting), and Title XIII on Climate Change Science and Technology (including carbon sequestration research).
Sponsor: Sen. Thomas A Daschle (D-SD) (1 cosponsor) – Action: 4/25/2002: Passed by the Senate by a vote of 88 – 11 and redesignated as H.R.4.

H.R.3037: The Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Investment Act of 2001, which, among other things, requires electricity generators to disclose their carbon dioxide emissions to potential consumers.
Sponsor: Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ) (10 cosponsors)

S.Amdt.3146 to S.Amdt.2917: An amendment to the Energy Policy Act of 2002 revising Title XI, establishing the National Greenhouse Gas Registry. As amended by Sen. Hagel on 4/24/2002, the amendment allows entities to report voluntarily their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and emission reductions to a federal database and registry. If, five years after enactment, less than 60% of U.S. anthropogenic GHG emissions have been reported voluntarily, reporting is required of large U.S. GHG emitters. The amendment also encourages future Congresses to consider registered reductions as applicable towards future GHG reduction requirements.
Sponsor: Sen. Chuck Hagel (R-NE)

S.Amdt.3239 to S.Amdt.2917: An amendment to the Energy Policy Act of 2002 revising Title XI, establishing the National Greenhouse Gas Registry. As amended by Sen. Brownback on 4/24/2002, the amendment allows entities to report voluntarily their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and emission reductions to a federal database and registry. If, five years after enactment, less than 60% of U.S. anthropogenic GHG emissions have been reported voluntarily, reporting is required of large U.S. GHG emitters. The amendment also encourages future Congresses to consider registered reductions as applicable towards future GHG reduction requirements.
Sponsor: Sen. Sam Brownback (R-KS) (3 cosponsors) – Action: 4/25/2002: Accepted by the Senate by voice vote as an amendment to the Energy Policy Act of 2002, which was then passed by the Senate by a vote of 88 – 11 and redesignated as H.R.4. (See S.Amdt.2917 and H.R.4 under Energy Policy.)

H.R.4611: National Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory Act of 2002, which requires reporting and disclosure by entities responsible for large GHG emissions.
Sponsor: Rep. John W. Olver (D-MA) (6 cosponsors)

H.R.5266: The Clear Skies Act, which requires reductions of SO2, NOX, and mercury emissions from electric powerplants, but not of CO2 emissions. Would exempt certain powerplants from the existing requirement that powerplants report their CO2 emissions.
Sponsor: Rep. Joe Barton (R-TX) (by request of the Bush Administration) (1 cosponsor)

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International Negotiations

H.R.1646: The Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2002 and 2003, which includes a Sense of the Congress Resolution urging the U.S. to continue participation in international negotiations with the objective of completing the rules and guidelines for the Kyoto Protocol.
Sponsor: Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-IL) (1 cosponsor) Action: 5/2/2001: The amendment that included the Kyoto resolution was offered by Rep. Robert Menendez (D-NJ) during markup in the House International Relations Committee and agreed to by a vote of 23 - 20. 5/16/2001: The bill, including the resolution, passed the House by a vote of 352 - 73. 9/30/2002: After conference with the Senate, during which the Menendez Amendment was removed, H.R.1646 became Public Law No: 107-228. (For more on the Menendez Amendment, see S.1401 below.)

H.R.2782: The Corporate Code of Conduct Act, which requires U.S. nationals that employ more than 20 persons in a foreign country to implement a Corporate Code of Conduct, which includes compliance with internationally recognized environmental standards relating to the mitigation of global climate change.
Sponsor: Rep. Cynthia A. McKinney (D-GA) (25 cosponsors)

S.1401: The Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2002 and 2003, which includes a Sense of the Congress Resolution urging the U.S. to participate in international negotiations, including putting forth a proposal at the meeting of the Conference of the Parties, with the objective of securing U.S. participation in a revised Kyoto Protocol or other future binding climate change agreements.
Sponsor: Sen. Joseph R. Biden, Jr. (D-DE) Action: 8/1/2001: The amendment that included the resolution was offered by Sen. John F. Kerry (D-MA) during markup in the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and agreed to by a vote of 19 - 0. The Committee then passed the bill. 2/15/2002: The Kerry resolution was included in Title X of the Energy Policy Act of 2002 (see S.Amdt.2917 under Energy Policy). 4/25/2002: The Energy Policy Act, with an amended version of the Kerry resolution, passed the Senate by a vote of 88 – 11 and was redesignated H.R.4.

S.Res.311: A resolution expressing the Sense of the Senate that, among other things, both at the World Summit on Sustainable Development and in other appropriate fora, the United States should re-engage in the negotiation of binding international agreements to address global climate change consistent with (A) U.S. commitments under the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change; (B) the findings of the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; and (C) the Sense of Congress on Climate Change approved by the Senate as part of the National Energy Policy Act of 2002 (see S.1401 above).
Sponsor: Sen. John F. Kerry (D-MA) (12 cosponsors)

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Climate-Friendly Technology R&D

S.389: The National Energy Security Act, which includes provisions of S.60, establishing carbon emission standards that clean coal facilities must meet in order to be eligible for a tax credit.
Sponsor: Sen. Frank H. Murkowski (R-AK) (20 cosponsors)

S.597: The Comprehensive and Balanced Energy Policy Act, which includes a title establishing a commission to study measures to achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States at the 1990 level by 2010 and below the 1990 level by 2020.
Sponsor: Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) (17 cosponsors)

S.1008: The Climate Change Strategy and Technology Innovation Act, which requires development of a U.S. Climate Change Response Strategy with the goal of stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system; establishes a research and development program toward the goal of stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations; and establishes the National Office of Climate Change Response within the Executive Office of the President.
Sponsor: Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-WV) (10 cosponsors) – Action: 8/2/2001: Reported favorably with amendments by the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee by voice vote. 2/15/2002: Included in S.Amdt.2917 (the Energy Policy Act of 2002) as Title X. 4/23/2002: Title X of S.Amdt.2917 modified by S.Amdt.3232 by voice vote of the Senate. 4/25/2002: S.Amdt.2917, including the amended Title X, passed by the Senate by a vote of 88 – 11 and redesignated as H.R.4. (See S.Amdt.2917 and H.R.4 under Energy Policy.)

S.1293: The Climate Change Tax Amendments, which create tax incentives for facilities (e.g., coal-fired power plants) that (a) replace existing facilities; (b) reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions on a per unit of output basis compared to the replaced facilites; and (c) use the same type of fuel as the replaced facilities.
Sponsor: Sen. Larry E. Craig (R-ID) (1 cosponsor)

S.1294: The Climate Change Risk Management Act, which requires development and implementation of a national strategy to manage the risks posed by potential climate change; reforms the voluntary reporting program established by section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992; and promotes technology research and dissemination.
Sponsor: Sen Frank H. Murkowski (R-AK) (5 cosponsors)

S.Amdt.3187 to S.Amdt.2917: Amendment to the Energy Policy Act of 2002, which promotes greenhouse gas reduction through the increased use of recovered material in federally funded projects involving procurement of cement or concrete.
Sponsor: Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-WV) – Action: 4/24/2002: Agreed to by the Senate by voice vote. 4/25/2001: S.Amdt.2917 passed the Senate by a vote of 88 – 11 and was redesignated as H.R.4. (See S.Amdt.2917 and H.R.4 under Energy Policy.)

S.Amdt.3232 to S.Amdt.2917: An amendment to the Energy Policy Act of 2002, revising Title X, establishing the National Climate Change Policy, based on S.1008 (see above).
Sponsor: Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) (8 cosponsors) – Action: 4/23/2002: Accepted by the Senate by voice vote. 4/25/2002: S.Amdt.2917, including S.Amdt.3232, passed by the Senate by a vote of 88 – 11 and redesignated as H.R.4. (See S.Amdt.2917 and H.R.4 under Energy Policy.)

H.R.4: The Securing America's Future Energy (SAFE) Act. The version of the bill passed by the House includes provisions of H.R.2587, which promotes advanced clean coal technologies by, among other things, promoting demonstration of technologies that capture, separate, reuse or dispose of carbon dioxide, and establishing carbon emission standards that clean coal facilities must meet in order to be eligible for a tax credit. Also includes provisions of H.R.2460, which requires the Department of Energy to investigate carbon and greenhouse gas mitigation and sequestration technologies. For the version passed by the Senate, see S.Amdt.2917 above.
Sponsor: Rep. W.J. Tauzin (R-LA) (3 cosponsors)

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Federal Budget and Appropriations

S.Amdt.249 to H.Con.Res.83: An amendment to the Budget Resolution, FY 2002, that adds $4.5 billion to the federal budget for climate change measures.
Sponsor: Sen. John F. Kerry (D-MA) (13 cosponsors) - Action: 4/6/2001: Agreed to by the Senate by voice vote.

S.Amdt.257 to H.Con.Res.83: An amendment to the Budget Resolution, FY 2002, that adds $50 billion to the federal budget to increase general environmental and natural resource funding, including for climate change measures.
Sponsor: Sen. Jon Corzine (D-NJ) (15 cosponsors) - Action: 4/5/2001: Not agreed to by the Senate by a vote of 46 - 54.

S.Amdt.346 to H.Con.Res.83: An amendment to the Budget Resolution, FY 2002, that adds $450 million to the federal budget to increase general environmental and natural resource funding, including for climate change measures.
Sponsor: Sen. Frank H. Murkowski (R-AK) (1 cosponsor) - Action: 4/5/2001: Agreed to by the Senate by voice vote.

(Eight appropriations bills for fiscal year (FY) 2001 contained a restriction on funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. The Bush Administration requested a continuation of the restriction for the same eight appropriations bills in FY 2002. Nevertheless, as shown here, none of the FY 2002 appropriations bills included the restriction.)

H.R.2217: The Interior Appropriations Act, FY 2002, which, as enacted, does not contain any restriction on funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. The version of the bill passed by the Senate included a provision prohibiting the use of funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. The version passed by the House did not. The restriction was removed in conference.
Sponsor: Rep. Joe Skeen (R-NM) Action: 11/5/2001: Became Public Law No: 107-63.

H.R.2299: The Transportation Appropriations Act, FY 2002, which, as enacted, does not contain any restriction on funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. The version of the bill passed by the House included a provision prohibiting the use of funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. (H.Amdt.118 was introduced to remove the restriction, but then withdrawn.) The version passed by the Senate did not include the restriction. The restriction was removed in conference.
Sponsor: Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY) -- Action: 12/18/2001: Became Public Law No: 107-87.

H.R.2311: The Energy and Water Appropriations Act, FY 2002, which, as enacted, does not contain any restriction on funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. None of the earlier versions of the FY 2002 bill included the restriction.
Sponsor: Rep. Sonny Callahan (R-AL) Action: 11/12/2001: Became Public Law No: 107-66.

H.R.2330: The Agriculture Appropriations Act, FY 2002, which, as enacted, does not contain any restriction on funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. When introduced, both the House bill and its Senate companion (S.1191) prohibited the use of funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. The House prohibition was struck by H.Amdt.165. The Senate prohibition was struck by S.Amdt.1997.
Sponsor: Rep. Henry Bonilla (R-TX) -- Action: 11/28/2001: Became Public Law No: 107-76.

H.R.2500: The Commerce, Justice, State Appropriations Act, FY 2002, which, as enacted, does not contain any restriction on funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. The version of the bill reported by the House Appropriations Committee prohibited the use of funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. The prohibition was struck by H.Amdt.184. None of the Senate versions of the FY 2002 bill included the restriction.
Sponsor: Rep. Frank R. Wolf (R-VA) - Action: 11/28/2001: Became Public Law No: 107-77.

H.R.2506: The Foreign Operations Appropriations Act, FY 2002, which, as enacted, does not contain any restriction on funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. The version of the bill reported by the House Appropriations Committee prohibited the use of funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. The prohibition was struck by H.Res. 199. None of the Senate versions of the FY 2002 bill included the restriction.
Sponsor: Rep. Jim Kolbe (R-AZ) - Action: 1/10/2002: Became Public Law No: 107-115.

H.R.2590: The Treasury-Postal Appropriations Act, FY 2002, which, as enacted, does not contain any restriction on funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. None of the previous versions of the FY 2002 bill contained the restriction.
Sponsor: Rep. Ernest J. Istook, Jr. (R-OK) - Action: 11/12/2001: Became Public Law No: 107-67.

H.R.2620: The Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Act, FY 2002, which, as enacted, does not contain any restriction on funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. None of the previous versions of the FY 2002 bill contained the restriction.
Sponsor: Rep. James T. Walsh (R-NY) - Action: 11/26/2001: Became Public Law No: 107-73.

H.Amdt.118 to H.R.2299: An amendment to the Transportation Appropriations Bill, FY 2002, which provides that the bill’s limitations applicable to the Kyoto Protocol do not apply to activities that are otherwise authorized by law.
Sponsor: Rep. John W. Olver (D-MA) - Action: 6/26/2001: By unanimous consent, the amendment was withdrawn.

H.Amdt.165 to H.R.2330: An amendment to the Agriculture Appropriations Bill, FY 2002, to strike section 726 from the bill. Section 726 prohibits use of funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol.
Sponsor: Rep. John W. Olver (D-MA) (1 cosponsor) - Action: 7/11/2001: Agreed to by the House by voice vote.

H.Amdt.184 to H.R.2500: An amendment to the Commerce-Justice-State Appropriations Bill, FY 2002, to strike section 623 from the bill. Section 623 prohibits the use of funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol.
Sponsor: Rep. John W. Olver (D-MA) (1 cosponsor) – Action: 7/18/2001: Agreed to by the House by voice vote.

H.Amdt. 226 to H.R. 2506: An amendment to the Foreign Operations Appropriations Bill, FY 2002, to prohibit financial assistance from the U.S. Ex-Im bank for projects that contribute to global warming, which are described as limited recourse projects or long-term programs involving oil and gas field development, a thermal powerplant, or a petrochemical plant or refinery.
Sponsor: Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich (D-OH) – Action: 7/24/2001: By unanimous consent, the amendment was withdrawn.

H.Res.199: A House Rule governing consideration of H.R.2506, the Foreign Operations Appropriations Bill, FY 2002, which includes a provision striking section 566 from H.R.2506. Section 566 prohibits use of funds for implementation of the Kyoto Protocol.
Sponsor: Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R-FL) – Action: 7/19/2001: Agreed to by the House by voice vote.

S.Amdt.1997 to H.R.2330: A Senate amendment to the Agriculture Appropriations Act, FY 2002, to strike a limitation relating to the Kyoto Protocol.
Sponsor: Sen. Herb Kohl (D-WI) -- Action: 10/25/2001: Agreed to by the Senate by unanimous consent.

S.2779: The Foreign Operations Appropriations Act, FY 2003, which, among other things, appropriates $15,100,000 for International Conservation Programs and the International Panel on Climate Change/United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change; and appropriates $175,000,000 to support policies and programs in developing countries, countries in transition and other partner countries that directly (1) promote energy conservation and efficiency and clean energy programs; (2) measure, monitor, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (3) increase carbon sequestration; and (4) enhance climate change mitigation and adaptation programs. The Act also requires a report to Congress on (1) federal FY 2003 climate change expenditures; and (2) FY 2002, 2003 and 2004 United States Agency for International Development funds associated with climate change.
Sponsor: Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-VT) - Action: 7/18/2002: Reported out of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

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Agriculture and Carbon Sequestration

S.130: The Food Security and Land Stewardship Act, which establishes a flexible fallow program under which, among other things, a producer may get credit for conservation uses of the set-aside acreage, including carbon sequestration.
Sponsor: Sen. Tim Johnson (D-SD)

S.765: The Carbon Sequestration Investment Tax Credit Act, which creates a carbon sequestration investment tax credit.
Sponsor: Sen. Sam Brownback (R-KS) (3 cosponsors)

S.769: The International Carbon Conservation Act, which establishes a carbon sequestration program and an implementing panel within the Department of Commerce to enhance international conservation, promote carbon sequestration, and encourage voluntary efforts on the issue of global climate change.
Sponsor: Sen. Sam Brownback (R-KS) (5 cosponsors)

S.785: The Carbon Conservation Incentive Act, which requires the Department of Agriculture to allow land to be enrolled in a program that promotes carbon sequestration.
Sponsor: Sen. Sam Brownback (R-KS) (2 cosponsors)

S.820: The Forest Resources for the Environment and the Economy Act, which requires the Department of Agriculture to assess opportunities to increase carbon storage on national forests and to facilitate voluntary, accurate reporting of forest projects that reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations.
Sponsor: Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) (1 cosponsor)

S.932: The Conservation Security Act, which promotes, as part of a conservation security program, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and the enhancement of carbon sequestration.
Sponsor: Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA) (19 cosponsors)

S.1255: The Carbon Sequestration and Reporting Act, which establishes a Carbon Advisory Council to advise on reporting guidelines for greenhouse gas sequestration from soil carbon and forest management actions; authorizes the Department of Agriculture to enter into cooperative agreements for forest carbon activities on private, State, and Indian lands; and includes provisions of S.785 to require the Department of Agriculture to allow land to be enrolled in a carbon sequestration program.
Sponsor: Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) (1 cosponsor)

S.1571: The Farm and Ranch Equity Act of 2001, which, among other things, establishes a carbon sequestration demonstration program.
Sponsor: Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-IN) (4 cosponsors)

S.1727: The Conservation Assistance and Regional Equity Act, which among other things, establishes a Conservation Security Program that promotes carbon sequestration on agricultural lands.
Sponsor: Sen. Harry M. Reid (D-NV) (11 cosponsors)

S.1731: The Agriculture, Conservation, and Rural Enhancement Act of 2001, which, in reauthorizing the Farm Bill, provides payments for farmers for practicing carbon sequestration and funds research into carbon sequestration. Also supports renewable energy and energy efficiency in agricultural operations.
Sponsor: Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA) Action: 11/27/2001: Passed by the Senate Agriculture Committee by voice vote. 2/13/2002: Passed by the Senate by a vote of 58 – 40, and redesignated as H.R.2646. (See H.R.2646 below.)

S.Amdt.2546 to S.1731: An amendment to the Farm Bill to promote forest carbon sequestration and carbon trading by farmer-owned cooperatives.
Sponsor: Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) (2 cosponsors) Action: 12/13/2001: Agreed to by the Senate by voice vote.

S.Amdt.3209 to S.Amdt.2917: An amendment to the Energy Policy Act of 2002 establishing carbon storage accounting models to help landowners quantify carbon release and sequestration from various resource uses.
Sponsor: Sen. Paul David Wellstone (D-MN) – Action: 4/25/2002: Agreed to by the Senate by voice vote, and included in S.Amdt.2917 as passed by the Senate by a vote of 88 – 11 and redesignated as H.R.4.

H.R.1949: The Conservation Security Act, which promotes, as part of a conservation security program, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and the enhancement of carbon sequestration. (House companion of S.932.)
Sponsor: Rep. John R. Thune (R-SD) (38 cosponsors)

H.R.2542: The American Farmland Stewardship Act, which establishes a Farmland Stewardship Program, under which, among other things, farmers may receive payment for activities that reduce greenhouse emissions and enhance carbon sequestration.
Sponsor: Rep. Adam Putnam (R-FL)

H.R.2646: The Farm Security Act, which reauthorizes the Farm Bill. In the version passed by the House, reauthorizes carbon cycle research and promotes carbon sequestration in forests. In the version passed by the Senate (see S.1731 above), provides payments for farmers for practicing carbon sequestration and funds research into carbon sequestration. The enacted law incorporate the House and Senate carbon sequestration provisions, except that payment for the practice of carbon sequestration is not explicitly provided for. The enacted law also incorporates the Senate bill’s support for renewable energy and energy efficiency on agricultural lands.
Sponsor: Rep. Larry Combest (R-TX) (1 cosponsor) Action: 8/2/2001: Reported by the House Agriculture Committee. 10/5/01: Passed by the House by a vote of 291 - 120. 2/13/2002: Senate version passed by the Senate by a vote of 58 – 40. 5/13/2002: Became Public Law No: 107-171.

S.892: The Clean and Renewable Fuels Act, which phases out the use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in fuel to promote the use of renewable fuels, and requires a report on the resulting greenhouse gas emission reductions.
Sponsor: Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA) (1 cosponsor)

S.1071: The Biofuels Air Quality Act, which promotes use of renewable fuels by, among other things, requiring consideration of the extent to which a proposed project under the congestion mitigation and air quality improvement program reduces atmospheric carbon emissions.
Sponsor: Sen. Christopher S. Bond (R-MO) (1 cosponsor)

H.R. 2088: The Biofuels Air Quality Act, which promotes use of renewable fuels by, among other things, requiring consideration of the extent to which a proposed project under the congestion mitigation and air quality improvement program reduces atmospheric carbon emissions. (House companion of S. 1071.)
Sponsor: Rep. John M. Shimkus (R-IL) (39 cosponsors)

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