2005 Newsletters

  • In This IssueReport from Montreal: Governments Launch New Climate TalksSummary of COP 11 and COP/MOP 1 Related Pew Center MaterialsSummary of COP 11 and COP/MOP 1On December 10, after two weeks of talks, delegates to the UN Climate Change Conference in Montreal concluded the decade-long round of negotiations that launched the Kyoto Protocol and opened a new round of talks to begin considering the future of the international climate effort.The meeting was a historic first - it served both as the 11th Session of the Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP 11), and, following Kyoto's entry into force in February, as the 1st Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (COP/MOP 1).Key outcomes included final adoption of the Kyoto "rulebook" and a two-track approach to consider next steps - negotiation of new binding commitments for Kyoto's developed country parties, and, under the Framework Convention, a nonbinding "dialogue on long-term cooperative action."Read the Pew Center's summary of key decisions made during COP 11 and COP/MOP 1.Report featured by the Pew Center in Montreal: International Climate Efforts Beyond 2012: Report of the Dialogue at PocanticoRelated Pew Center materialsReport: Beyond Kyoto: Advancing the International Effort Against Climate Change (December 2003)Report: Climate Data: Insights and Observations (November 2004)Report: International Climate Efforts Beyond 2012: A Survey of Approaches (November 2004)Report: Climate Data: A Sectoral Perspective (August 2005)Analysis: Implications for U.S. Companies of Kyoto's Entry Into Force without the United States (PDF) (January 2002)Background on the Kyoto ProtocolDonate to the Pew Center on Global Climate ChangeThe Pew Center is a public charity solely supported by grants and contributions from individuals and charitable foundations. Your donation will help us continue to do what we do best: Bring together divergent views--representing science, business and government--in an effort to find environmentally sound and economically viable solutions to global warming.Make a donation online or by mail:Pew Center on Global Climate Change2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 550Arlington, VA 22201
  • In This IssuePew Dialogue Urges New Approaches to Strengthen International Climate Change Efforts - New International ReportGovernments to Convene in Montreal for COP11 and MOP 1Lugar-Biden Resolution Calls for U.S. Participation in International Climate Change NegotiationsPew Dialogue Urges New Approaches to Strengthen International Climate Change EffortsOn Tuesday, November 15, the Pew Center on Global Climate Change released a major new report outlining options and recommendations for advancing the international climate change effort post-2012. The report is from the Climate Dialogue at Pocantico, a group of 25 senior policymakers and stakeholders from 15 countries convened by the Pew Center.Participants in the Pocantico dialogue included: policymakers from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Germany, Japan, Mexico, Tuvalu, the United Kingdom, and the United States; senior executives from Alcoa, BP, DuPont, Eskom (South Africa), Exelon, Rio Tinto, and Toyota; and experts from the Pew Center, The Energy and Resources Institute (India), and the World Economic Forum.The new report, International Climate Efforts Beyond 2012 - Report of the Climate Dialogue at Pocantico, was formally released at an event hosted by Senator Richard G. Lugar (R-Indiana) and Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D-Delaware), the Chairman and Ranking Minority Member of U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Other speakers at the event included representatives of Alcoa, Exelon, and Rio Tinto.Read the press release.Read what world leaders in policy and business say about the report.Read the report.Governments to Convene in Montreal for COP 11 and MOP 1Governments will meet in Montreal on November 28-December 9 for the latest round of international climate negotiations. Two simultaneous events will be held: the Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention (COP 11) and the first Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (COP/MOP 1).A key issue in Montreal will be whether and how to launch a new multilateral process to consider ways to extend the international climate effort beyond 2012, when current commitments under the Kyoto Protocol expire.The Pew Center will host "Beyond 2012 - A High-Level Forum," a side event featuring an exchange of views among Ministers and senior business and NGO leaders on the new report of the Climate Dialogue at Poantico. The event will take place at 1-3 pm on Wednesday, December 8, in the Palais des Congrès.Check the Pew Center website the week of December 12 for a report on the Montreal talks.Learn more about the Kyoto Protocol.Lugar-Biden Resolution Calls for U.S. Participation in International Climate Change NegotiationsOn November 15, at the formal release of the Pew Center's report International Climate Efforts Beyond 2012, Senator Richard G. Lugar (R-Indiana) and Senator Joseph R. Biden, Jr. (D-Delaware) announced the introduction of a joint Sense of the Senate resolution.S.Res. 312 calls for the United States to participate in negotiations under the Framework Convention on Climate Change to establish mitigation commitments by all major GHG-emitting countries.Read S.Res. 312 (PDF format).Read Senator Lugar's press release on S.Res. 312 (word format).Read Senator Biden's press release on S.Res. 312 (PDF format).Read Eileen Claussen's statement on S. Res. 312 (PDF format).Donate to the Pew Center on Global Climate ChangeThe Pew Center is a public charity solely supported by grants and contributions from individuals and charitable foundations. Your donation will help us continue to do what we do best: Bring together divergent views-representing science, business and government- in an effort to find environmentally sound and economically viable solutions to global warming.Make a donation online or by mail:Pew Center on Global Climate Change2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 550Arlington, VA 22201
  • In This IssueWas Katrina's Power a Product of Global Warming? General Electric Company Joins the Pew Center's Business Environmental Leadership Council U.S. Mayors Adopt Climate Protection Agreement and Other States News Climate Data: A Sectoral Perspective - New International Report The U.S. Electric Power Sector and Climate Change Mitigation - New Report Towards A Climate-Friendly Built Environment - New Report Was Katrina's Power a Product of Global Warming?With a unique combination of geography, expansive lowlands (particularly in the New Orleans area), wetland loss, deforestation, rapid development, large populations of the poor, and a heavy concentration of industry, the Gulf Coast is extremely vulnerable to hurricanes. Although we cannot be certain global warming intensified Katrina per se, it clearly has created circumstances under which powerful storms like Katrina are more likely to occur now and in the future. Learn more. General Electric Company Joins the Pew Center's Business Environment Leadership CouncilGeneral Electric Company has joined the Pew Center's Business Environmental Leadership Council and their efforts to address global climate change. GE, one of the world's largest companies, has committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions one percent by 2012 and the intensity of its GHG emissions 30 percent by 2008 (both compared to 2004). Based on the company's projected growth, GE's GHG emissions would have risen 40 percent by 2012 without further action. In addition, GE is committed to doubling its investment in environmental technologies to $1.5 billion by 2010. These efforts are part of GE's 'Ecomagination' initiative to aggressively bring to market new technologies that will help customers meet pressing environmental challenges.Read the press release and learn more about GE's Ecomagination initiative. U.S. Mayors Adopt Climate Protection Agreement & Other States NewsThe U.S. Conference of Mayors voted unanimously to support the Climate Protection Agreement sponsored by Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels. The agreement, adopted June 13, 2005, commits the 1,183 cities represented to the goal of reducing GHG emissions 7% below 1990 levels by 2012.Other States News:*Texas increased its Renewable Portfolio Standard when Governor Rick Perry signed a bill on August 1 increasing the amount of renewable generation required in the state. In January 2002, Texas implemented a renewable energy mandate that required 2,000 MW of new renewable generation be built in the state by 2009. The updated law increases this capacity requirement to 5,880 MW by 2015, which will meet about 5% of the state's projected electricity demand. The legislation also sets a cumulative target of installing 10,000 MW of renewable generation capacity by 2025 and requires that the state must meet 500 MW of the 2025 target with non-wind renewable generation.*Illinois enacted Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standards when the Illinois Commerce Commission adopted Governor Rod Blagojevich's two- part Sustainable Energy Plan on July 19. To implement the RPS, the state's two largest utilities have agreed to acquire 2% of their electricity from renewable sources (wind, solar thermal energy, photovoltaic cells and panels, biomass, and existing hydropower) by the end of 2006; add another 1% every year; and reach the goal of 8% by 2013. To implement the Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard, the utilities will create programs to slow the increase in electricity demand 10% by 2008, with an ultimate goal of slowing Illinois' growth in electricity demand 25% by 2015.* New Mexico joined a growing number of states with targets for greenhouse gas emissions reductions when Governor Bill Richardson signed an Executive Order on Thursday, June 9, 2005. The Governor set New Mexico's targets at achieving 2000 emissions levels by 2012, 10% below 2000 levels by 2020, and a 75% reduction below 2000 emissions levels by 2050.Learn more about these and other steps taken at the state level. Climate Data: A Sectoral Perspective - New International ReportThis new international report "Climate Data: A Sectoral Perspective" examines emissions, production, and consumption data for energy, transportation, manufacturing, land use and other key economic sectors. It focuses primarily on the 25 countries with the largest greenhouse gas emissions, and is a companion to "Climate Data: Insights and Observations," an earlier Pew Center report examining data at the global and national levels. Both papers were prepared by the World Resources Institute for the Pew Center's Climate Dialogue at Pocantico, an ongoing series of discussions among senior policymakers and stakeholders on the international climate effort. A closer look at sectoral data will be provided in a forthcoming WRI report, Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Policy, due for release in December. The U.S. Electric Power Sector and Climate Change Mitigation - New ReportThis report, "The U.S. Electric Power Sector and Climate Change Mitigation," is essentially "Climate Change and Electricity 101." The report explores options for reducing the electric power sector's GHG emissions over the next decade and over the next half century. Towards a Climate-Friendly Built Environment - New ReportThis report, "Towards A Climate-Friendly Built Environment," is essentially "Climate Change and Buildings 101." The report explores options for reducing GHG emissions from buildings over the next decade and over the next 50 years. Donate to the Pew Center on Global Climate ChangeThe Pew Center is a public charity solely supported by grants and contributions from individuals and charitable foundations. Your donation will help us continue to do what we do best: Bring together divergent views-representing science, business and government- in an effort to find environmentally sound and economically viable solutions to global warming.Make a donation online or by mail:Pew Center on Global Climate Change2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 550Arlington, VA 22201
  • In This IssueOutcomes of the G8 Summit Pew Center Statement on G8 Summit Global Warming and the G8: Q&A with Eileen Claussen World Economic Forum Business Leaders Support Action on Climate Change Joint Science Academies Statement on Climate ChangeOutcomes of the G8 SummitAt the G8 Summit held on July 6-8, 2005, in Gleneagles, Scotland, leaders of the Group of 8 countries issued a joint communiqué and a "plan of action" on Climate Change, Clean Energy, and Sustainable Development.In the communiqué, the leaders declared that "climate change is a serious and long-term challenge that has the potential to affect every part of the globe" and that human activities "contribute in large part to increases in greenhouse gases associated with the warming of the Earth's surface."The plan of action adopted by the G8 leaders identifies a range of activities to promote research, information exchange, and cooperation on energy efficiency, renewable and other clean energy sources, adaptation, and illegal loggingRead our G8 summary.Pew Center Statement on G8 SummitThe G8 Summit in Gleneagles has advanced the international debate on climate change and opened a new political dialogue that can in time lead to broad, effective international action.Read the full statement.Global Warming and the G8: Q&A with Eileen ClaussenEileen Claussen, President of the Pew Center on Global Climate Change, participated in a live online chat with Washingtonpost.com on July 6, 2005. Ms. Claussen discussed the G8 Summit and the opportunities and challenges the world faces in dealing with the issue of climate change.Read the transcript.World Economic Forum Business Leaders Support Action on Climate ChangeThe heads of twenty-four global companies released and presented a statement on June 9, 2005 expressing strong support for action to mitigate climate change. The statement, prepared by the G8 Climate Change Roundtable convened by the World Economic Forum, was presented to UK Prime Minister Tony Blair.Read the statement and press release.Joint Science Academies Statement: Global Response to Climate ChangeThe national science academies of the G8 nations and Brazil, China and India issued a joint statement on June 7, 2005 on the science surrounding global climate change.The statement calls on world leaders, particularly those of the G8 countries, to acknowledge that the threat of climate change is clear and increasing, to address its causes, and to prepare for its consequences.Read the statement (PDF).Donate to the Pew Center on Global Climate ChangeThe Pew Center is a public charity solely supported by grants and contributions from individuals and charitable foundations. Your donation will help us continue to do what we do best: Bring together divergent views--representing science, business and government--in an effort to find environmentally sound and economically viable solutions to global warming.Make a donation online or by mail:Pew Center on Global Climate Change2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 550Arlington, VA 22201
  • In This IssueExelon Corporation Joins the Pew Center's Business Environmental Leadership Council California's Governor Sets Aggressive Emissions Targets Canada's Climate Change Plan: A Summary Beyond Kyoto: Options For Post-2012 Climate Agreement New Section of Website Launched: Articles Two New ReportsExelon Corporation Joins the Pew Center's Business Environmental Leadership CouncilExelon Corporation has joined the Pew Center's Business Environmental Leadership Council and their efforts to address global climate change. Exelon Corporation, one of the nation's largest electric utilities and a Fortune 500 company, has committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by eight percent from 2001 levels by 2008. Exelon has also committed to work with, and encourage, its suppliers to reduce their GHG emissions. Learn more about Exelon's emissions reduction initiatives.California's Governor Sets Aggressive Emissions TargetsCalifornia Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed an executive order on June 1 establishing aggressive emissions targets for the state. The order calls for reducing California's GHG emissions by 11% below current levels by 2010, 25% by 2020, and 80% by 2050.Other States News:Washington State Governor Gregoire recently signed two bills (SB 5111 and SB 5101) that will increase both supply and demand for renewable energy generation. The Governor also signed HB 1397 adopting California's vehicle GHG emissions standards for Washington State, conditional on Oregon's adoption of the standard. Iowa Governor Thomas Vilsack signed an executive order on April 22 mandating a 15% improvement in energy efficiency at state facilities by 2010, the procurement of hybrid or alternative-fuel state vehicles, the purchase of equipment with the lowest life-cycle cost when possible, and the purchase of 10% renewable electricity by state agencies.Learn more about these and other steps taken at the state level.Canada's Climate Change PlanCanada is the world's eighth largest GHG emitter. Canada ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in 1992 and its subsequent Kyoto Protocol in 2002, committing to reduce its GHG emissions by 6 percent below 1990 levels in 2008-2012.Prime Minister Paul Martin pledged during the 2004 national election campaign to develop a new plan to meet Canada's Kyoto target. Read a summary of Canada's Climate Change Plan.Beyond Kyoto: Options For Post-2012 Climate AgreementIn testimony to the Canadian Parliament, the Pew Center's Elliot Diringer describes options for advancing the international climate change effort beyond 2012 and the Center's efforts to build consensus among policymakers and stakeholders from around the world. Read the testimony.New Section of Website Launched: ArticlesA compilation of Pew authored articles are available at:/press_room/articlesopeds/Upcoming Reports"The U.S. Electric Power Sector and Climate Change Mitigation"Essentially a "Climate Change and Electricity 101," this report explores options for reducing the electric power sector's GHG emissions over the next decade and over the next half century.Expected Release Date: Late May 2005"Towards A Climate-Friendly Built Environment"Likewise, this "Climate Change and Buildings 101" explores options for reducing GHG emissions from buildings over the next decade and over the next 50 years.Expected Release Date: Late May 2005Donate to The Pew Center on Global Climate ChangeClimate change is a serious problem that demands serious action. The Pew Center is a public charity solely supported by grants and contributions from individuals and charitable foundations. Your donation will help the Pew Center continue to be the leading voice for concrete, cost-effective action against climate change. Together, climate change is a challenge we can meet. Make a donation online or by mail:Pew Center on Global Climate Change2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 550Arlington, VA 22201
  • In This IssueNew Pew Center Report: "The Cost of U.S. Forest-based Carbon Sequestration" Pew Center Assessment of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme Innovative Approaches to Climate Change: A State-Federal Workshop New Pew Center In-Brief:"The 10-50 Solution: Options for a Low-Carbon Future" Answers to Key Questions Raised by Michael Crichton in "State of Fear" Speech:"Climate Change: Beyond A Sideways Approach" Speech:"Technology, Public Policy and Coal: Making the Connection" Pew Center AnnouncesNew Director of Markets and Business Development Upcoming ReportsThe Cost of U.S. Forest-based Carbon Sequestration: New Report"The Cost of Forest-Based Carbon Sequestration"investigates the potential for incorporating land-use changes into climate policy. The new Pew Center report looks at the true "opportunity costs" of using land for sequestration, in contrast with other productive uses. The report also examines the many factors that drive the economics of storing carbon in forests over long periods of time.Read the full report.Pew Center Assessment of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme"The European Union Emissions Trading System Insights and Observations" discusses the EU-ETS in the context of ongoing emission abatement efforts and policy initiatives to meet EU-25 member state targets under the Kyoto Protocol.Read the full analysis (PDF format).Innovative Approaches to Climate Change: A State-Federal WorkshopA recent Pew Center workshop explored states' actions while highlighting some of the lessons learned from these efforts for state and federal policy makers. "Innovative Approaches to Climate Change: A State-Federal Workshop" included panel discussions and keynote presentations from top state environmental, energy and transportation officials, as well as representatives of industry and the U.S. Congress.View the presentations.New Pew Center In-Brief: "The 10-50 Solution: Options for a Low-Carbon Future"The new Pew Center In-Brief addresses possible technological solutions for a low-carbon future in the next 50 years and identifies policy options for the next 10 years to help push these technologies into the market.Read the full Brief.Answers to Key Questions Raised by Michael Crichton in "State of Fear"Michael Crichton's latest novel, "State of Fear", contains a number of strawman arguments, misinterpretations of the scientific literature, and even a few misleading statements drawn from the so-called "skeptics". The Pew Center has compiledanswers to key questions raised by M. Crichton in "State of Fear".Speech: "Climate Change: Beyond A Sideways Approach"Eileen Claussen spoke at the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara.Read her speech.Speech: "Technology, Public Policy and Coal: Making the Connection"Eileen Claussen recently spoke at the Coal21 Annual Conference in Sydney, Australia.Read her speech.Pew Center Announces New Director of Markets and Business DevelopmentThe Pew Center on Global Climate Change is pleased to announce that it has recently brought on board a key new staff member to its diverse and dedicated team. Mr. Truman Semans joins the Pew Center as Director of Markets and Business Development. He manages the Center's Business Environmental Leadership Council (BELC) of 38 major corporations working to address issues related to climate change. He also directs Pew Center work on climate-related market and investment issues and coordinates the Center's external alliances.Learn more about Truman Semans.Upcoming Reports"The U.S. Electric Power Sector and Climate Change Mitigation"Essentially a "Climate Change and Electricity 101," this report explores options for reducing the electric power sector's GHG emissions over the next decade and over the next half century.Expected Release Date: Late May 2005"Towards A Climate-Friendly Built Environment"Likewise, this "Climate Change and Buildings 101" explores options for reducing GHG emissions from buildings over the next decade and over the next 50 years.Expected Release Date: Late May 2005Donate to The Pew Center on Global Climate ChangeClimate change is a serious problem that demands serious action. The Pew Center is a public charity solely supported by grants and contributions from individuals and charitable foundations. Your donation will help the Pew Center continue to be the leading voice for concrete, cost-effective action against climate change. Together, climate change is a challenge we can meet.Make a donation onlineor by mail:Pew Center on Global Climate Change2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 550Arlington, VA 22201
  • In This IssueKyoto Protocol Enters Into Force: Special Website Coverage Now AvailableThe Kyoto Protocol, an international climate change agreement, enters into force on February 16th, 2005. The Protocol sets binding targets for developed countries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions an average 5.2 percent below 1990 levels.With entry into force, Kyoto's emission targets become binding legal commitments for those industrialized countries that have ratified it. The Kyoto Protocol was designed as a first step. The challenge now is forging an international framework that engages all major emitting countries in an effective long-term effort.The Pew Center on Global Climate Change has created a special section looking at the implications of Kyoto's entry into force, including history, related issues and reports and analyses. The section devotes significant space to the question: What happens next?Learn more.Additional ResourcesReport: Climate Data: Insights and Observations (December 2004)Q & A: Kyoto ProtocolGlossary: Key Terms Related to the Kyoto ProtocolEvents Highlighting Kyoto's Entry Into ForceUnited Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change websiteLearn about international, national and state emissions targets.