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Major companies back Paris Agreement

Media Advisory

November 15, 2016

Contact:

US: Laura Rehrmann, rehrmannl@c2es.org, 703-516-0621

Marrakech: Anthony Mansell, mansella@c2es.org, 202-384-0774 (cell) 

Major companies back Paris Agreement

Hear from companies at livestreamed event today

MARRAKECH – At an event today at COP 22 in Marrakech, the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) will highlight climate action by business, including a recent statement signed by 11 leading corporations in support of the Paris Agreement.

The event, to be held at the U.S. Center at the U.N. Climate Change Conference, will feature remarks by senior representatives of Berkshire Hathaway Energy, Ingersoll Rand, Mars and Microsoft. They are among the more than 150 U.S. firms that have committed to specific climate actions as part of the American Business Act on Climate Pledge.

The event occurs at 4 p.m. Marrakech time (11 a.m. EST) and will be livestreamed. (See details below).

C2ES Executive Vice President Elliot Diringer will highlight a statement organized by C2ES and signed by 11 major companies based or with major operations in the United States welcoming the Paris Agreement's entry into force, and pledging to work with governments to implement their contributions.

The statement, released when the threshold for entry into force was reached in October, says the Paris Agreement establishes “an inclusive, pragmatic and, hopefully, durable framework for progressively strengthening efforts globally to address the causes and consequences of climate change.”

The statement was endorsed by Berkshire Hathaway Energy, Calpine, HP Inc., Intel, LafargeHolcim, Microsoft, National Grid, PG&E, Rio Tinto, Schneider Electric, and Shell.

“As businesses concerned about the well-being of our investors, our customers, our communities and our planet, we are committed to working on our own and in partnership with governments to mobilize the technology, investment and innovation needed to transition to a sustainable low-carbon economy,” the statement says.

It says the Paris Agreement facilitates stronger private sector action by providing long-term direction, promoting transparency, addressing competitiveness, and facilitating carbon pricing.

“Many companies recognize the costly impacts of climate change, and see investment and growth opportunities in a clean-energy transition,” said C2ES President Bob Perciasepe. “These companies are taking action and are looking to governments to help lead the way.”

Read the full business statement: http://bit.ly/Biz4Climate

Watch the livestream: http://www.state.gov/e/oes/climate/cop22/video/index.htm

EVENT DETAILS:

CHARTING A LOW-CARBON COURSE FOR THE U.S. ECONOMY

Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 4 p.m. – 5 p.m. local time (11 a.m.-Noon EST)?U.S. Center, Blue Zone, Marrakech?Livestream: http://www.state.gov/e/oes/climate/cop22/video/index.htm

Senior officials from major corporations discuss ways business leadership can help achieve climate goals in this live-streamed event co-sponsored with the Edison Electric Institute (EEI).

•    Cathy Woollums, Senior Vice President, Environmental Services and Chief Environmental Counsel, Berkshire Hathaway Energy

•    Nanette Lockwood, Global Director, Policy and Advocacy, Ingersoll Rand

•    Kevin Rabinovitch, Global Sustainability Director, Mars Incorporated

•    Tamara “TJ” DiCaprio, Senior Director of Environmental Sustainability, Microsoft

•    Elliot Diringer, Executive Vice President, C2ES

•    Eric Holdsworth, Senior Director, Climate Programs, EEI

For reporters in Marrakech, C2ES will also host a second side event:

Post-Election: The Outlook for U.S. Climate Policy

November 16, 2016

6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

IETA Pavilion, Blue Zone

•    Nathanial Keohane, Vice President, Global Climate, Environmental Defense Fund

•    Josh Klein, Senior Professional Staff, Senate Foreign Relations Committee 

•    Matt Rodriquez, Secretary for Environmental Protection, California

•    Cathy Woollums, Senior Vice President, Environmental Services and Chief Environmental Counsel, Berkshire Hathaway Energy

•    Elliot Diringer, Executive Vice President, C2ES

C2ES Resources

•    UNFCCC Climate Transparency: Lessons Learned

•    Key Issues in Completing the Paris Climate Architecture

•    Linking Non-State Action with the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change

About C2ES: The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) is an independent, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization promoting strong policy and action to address our energy and climate challenges. Learn more at www.c2es.org

Bob Perciasepe on the results of the 2016 presidential election

Statement of Bob Perciasepe
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

November 9, 2016

On the results of the 2016 U.S. election:

We urge President-elect Trump to take time to study the issue of climate change and hear a broad range of perspectives. He’ll find that a majority of Americans across the political spectrum support stronger climate action. Many cities, states and businesses are already acting. Business leaders recognize that extreme weather is driving up costs and that clean energy is creating economic opportunities essential to America’s future.

Smart investments and technological innovation have started America on a clean-energy transition. Building on that momentum will protect communities from rising climate damages and will contribute to strong and sustained economic growth.

The longer we wait to address climate change, the costlier it will be. The modern infrastructure and advanced technologies we need to cut emissions and strengthen climate resilience will create jobs at home and position U.S. firms to better compete in the emerging clean-energy economy.

Virtually every country in the world has committed to taking climate action and U.S. leadership is needed to hold them accountable for their promises.

As an independent, nonpartisan organization, C2ES will continue to provide evenhanded analysis and is committed to working with our newly elected leaders and with business and other stakeholders to build common ground toward common-sense climate solutions.

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To talk to a C2ES expert, contact Laura Rehrmann at rehrmannl@c2es.org

About C2ES: The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) is an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization working to forge practical solutions to climate change. Our mission is to advance strong policy and action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, promote clean energy, and strengthen resilience to climate impacts. Learn more at www.c2es.org.

 

UNFCCC Climate Transparency: Lessons Learned

UNFCCC Climate Transparency: Lessons Learned

November 2016

by Jennifer Huang

Download the fact sheet (PDF)

The Paris Agreement establishes an “enhanced transparency framework” to build mutual trust and confidence and to promote effective implementation. This framework combines common reporting and review requirements for all parties with “built-in flexibility” for developing countries. The agreement requires that parties, in elaborating the operational details of the transparency framework, build on experience with existing transparency arrangements under the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Over the past year, developed and developing countries have shared their experiences with the existing transparency system in a variety of public forums. This brief highlights key lessons learned that can help inform the design of the Paris transparency framework.

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Key Issues in Completing the Paris Climate Architecture

Key Issues in Completing
the Paris Climate Architecture

October 2016

By Jennifer Huang and Anthony Mansell

Download the fact sheet (PDF)

 

The Paris Agreement establishes an international framework to strengthen the global response to climate change. Governments are now negotiating operational aspects of the agreement, including details of the transparency framework; a five-year cycle to review collective progress and update parties’ contributions; and the agreement’s market-related provisions. These implementing decisions are due to be adopted at the first session of the agreement’s governing body, the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement, known as the CMA. With the agreement’s rapid entry into force, CMA 1 will open at COP 22 in Marrakech, Morocco, earlier than anticipated; it likely will be extended beyond COP 22 to allow more time to complete the decisions. This brief outlines the Paris Agreement’s core provisions, major issues still to be decided, and some of the options before parties.

Anthony Mansell
Jennifer Huang
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Linking Non-State Action with the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change

Linking Non-State Action with the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change

October 2016

By David Wei, Associate Director,
Business for Social Responsibility

Download the fact sheet (PDF)

The 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP 21) catalyzed an unprecedented showing of climate action and commitment by a wide range of non-state actors, including businesses and investors, subnational governments, and civil society organizations. Governments took a number of steps in Paris to engage non-state actors more directly through the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Many stakeholder groups are working to further strengthen the contributions of non-state actors to the global climate effort, and at COP 22 in Marrakech, Morocco, two high-level “champions” will report on implementation of a new Action Agenda. This brief outlines recent steps to strengthen the visibility of non-state action in the UNFCCC and options for more closely linking the two.

David Wei
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Montreal Protocol

The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer is considered the world’s most successful international environmental treaty. 

Under the Protocol, nations phased out chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) – a class of compounds that were used mostly in aerosol sprays, refrigerants, foams and as solvents, and were damaging the protective ozone layer that shields the planet from harmful ultraviolet radiation. Recent evidence shows that the ozone hole over Antarctica is beginning to repair itself because of efforts under the Protocol to reduce ozone-depleting substances.

Because ozone-depleting substances and many of their substitutes are also potent greenhouse gases, their phase-out under the Montreal Protocol is critical to international efforts to address climate change.

Following nearly a decade of talks, a landmark agreement was reached October 15, 2016, at the 28th Meeting of the Parties of the Montreal Protocol in Kigali, Rwanda, to phase down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), CFC substitutes that, while not harmful to the ozone layer, are a fast-growing source of potent greenhouse gases contributing to climate change.

HFCs are widely used in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, and other applications. Though they now account for less than 1 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, HFCs are extremely potent greenhouse gases whose use is projected to grow rapidly, particularly in developing countries.

The Kigali Amendment sets out a schedule of targets and timetables for all developed and developing countries to phase down their use of HFCs. The amendment links these control requirements with a renewed commitment by developed countries to provide financial support for developing countries through the Protocol’s Multilateral Fund. The agreement sets out key principles for how the fund will transition from supporting projects aimed at safeguarding the ozone layer to spurring action focused on climate protection.

Because HFCs have a relatively short atmospheric lifetime (compared to carbon dioxide), their phasedown could reduce temperature changes in 2100 by an estimated 0.5 degrees Celsius. These reductions are critical to meeting the long-term goal of the Paris Agreement to keep warming well below 2 degrees.

History

The Montreal Protocol is a part of the 1985 Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer, which commits its 197 parties to protect human health and environment against “adverse effects” of human-induced changes to the ozone layer. 

The Montreal Protocol, which was adopted in 1987 and entered into force in 1989, limits the consumption and production of ozone-depleting substances. Since its entry into force, the Montreal Protocol has phased out over 98 percent of the world’s consumption of ozone-depleting substances.

C2ES Resources:

Nations agree on historic HFC phasedown

Nations came together Saturday and agreed to take a big bite out of future increases in global temperatures. Following nearly a decade of talks, a landmark agreement to phase down hyrofluorocarbons (HFCs) was reached at the conclusion of the 28th Meeting of the Parties of the Montreal Protocol in Rwanda.

The Kigali Amendment sets out a schedule of targets and timetables for all developed and developing countries to phase down their use of HFCs,a family of industrial chemicals used worldwide in air conditioners and refrigeration that are one of the most potent and rapidly expanding greenhouse gases.

The amendment links these control requirements with a renewed commitment by developed countries to provide financial support for developing countries through the Protocol’s Multilateral Fund. The agreement sets out key principles for how the fund will transition from supporting projects aimed at safeguarding the ozone layer to spurring action focused on climate protection.

Curbing HFCs is a relatively inexpensive way to achieve significant near-term reductions in climate pollution and is essential to achieving the Paris Agreement goal of limiting temperature increases to well below 2 degrees Celsius.  More than 100 nations came together at the recent U.N. General Assembly to press for an ambitious reduction schedule.

In the final stages of negotiations in Kigali, it was clear that only a few  countries stood in opposition. To break the logjam, the agreement provided the flexibility for reluctant developing countries (India, Pakistan, Iran, Iraq, and the Gulf States) to meet a phasedown schedule with a baseline and reduction steps delayed by four years. It also included a separate provision for an alternative baseline and compliance schedule for Russia, Belarus and several neighboring countries. 

Phasing down HFCs offers a unique opportunity for a significant double win for the climate. HFCs themselves are a potent, fast-growing climate pollutant. Reducing HFCs can reduce global warming by as much as 0.5 degrees by the end of the century. Because they are widely used in rapidly expanding, high energy-consuming refrigeration and air conditioning sectors, the transition to alternatives also provides an opportunity to reduce climate change through enhanced energy efficiency. 

The Kigali Amendment seeks to capture these benefits first through a fast start fund created by 19 philanthropic groups and individuals who have contributed $53 million to move from HFCs to more energy-efficient alternatives.

In addition, a decision reached in Kigali calls for the Multilateral Fund, in developing and supporting projects shifting to alternatives, to fund investments aimed at maintaining and enhancing energy efficiency. 

The adoption of the HFC amendment is an important accomplishment, but much work lies ahead in making a successful transition to energy-efficient, low or zero global warming alternatives. For example, hydrocarbon refrigerants and foam blowing agents represent important alternatives, but because they are flammable, changes in national and industry standards and codes will be required to ensure that they can be used safely. The Parties agreed on a decision aimed at facilitating the necessary revisions to standards and codes and supporting enhanced training of air conditioning and refrigeration technicians in the safe use of these alternatives through the Multilateral Fund.

Hydrofluorooleinfs (HFOs) are also a family of chemical substitutes to replace HFCs. India and China raised concerns  about whether patents held by transnational chemical companies on the production and use of HFOs would block their access to them. Over the coming years the availability of HFOs will need to be advanced through expanding commercial arrangements between companies, which could  be facilitated by financial support from the Multilateral Fund.

The Kigali Amendment on HFCs caps an extraordinary couple of weeks for global climate protection. Enough countries have ratified the Paris Agreement that it has already met its conditions to formally enter into force. In addition, a path-breaking agreement was reached to limit emissions from international air travel.

After years of slow and difficult global efforts to address climate change,  these recent developments demonstrate a new and stronger commitment to tackle the near and present danger of this critical threat to our global community.

 

Statement on Montreal Protocol amendment on HFCs

Statement of Bob Perciasepe
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

October 15, 2016

On the agreement in Kigali, Rwanda, to amend the Montreal Protocol to phase down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), one of the most potent and fastest growing sources of greenhouse gases.

Less than a year after the Paris Agreement, and just a week after a new pact limiting greenhouse gas emissions from aviation, today’s agreement in Kigali completes a powerful trifecta of international accords combating climate change. This step alone can help avoid half a degree of warming by century’s end.

The United States again helped set the stage for agreement, adopting strong domestic regulations to limit HFCs and pressing other nations to commit to an ambitious timeline for freezing and phasing down use of these powerful climate pollutants. In an unprecedented move, foundations and other philanthropists also pledged $53 million to help developing countries move from HFCs to more energy-efficient alternatives.

Over nearly three decades, the Montreal Protocol has virtually eliminated the substances that were damaging the Earth’s protective ozone layer. With strong support from the private sector, nations are now taking the next step by enlisting the Protocol to dramatically reduce the impact of HFCs on our climate.

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For more information: Read C2ES Senior Advisor Stephen Seidel's blog

To speak to a C2ES expert, please contact Laura Rehrmann at rehrmannl@c2es.org

About C2ES: The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) is an independent, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization promoting strong policy and action to address our energy and climate challenges. Learn more at www.c2es.org.

C2ES Events in Marrakech

Promoted in Energy Efficiency section: 
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Charting a Low-Carbon Course for the U.S. EconomyU.S. Center, Blue ZoneNovember 15, 2016, 4 p.m. -- 5 p.m. (11 a.m.-Noon EST) Side Event: Post-Election: The Outlook for U.S. Climate PolicyIETA Pavilion, Blue ZoneNov 16, 2016, 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Reception: Business-Driven DiplomacyU.S. Center, Blue ZoneNovember 16, 2016, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  

Charting a Low-Carbon Course for the U.S. Economy

November 15, 2016
4 p.m. -- 5 p.m. (11 a.m.-Noon EST)
U.S. Center, Blue Zone

See a recap of this event on our blog: Businesses continue to lead on climate

American business understands that there is both opportunity in getting ahead of the climate curve, and considerable risk and cost to inaction. The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) and the Edison Electric Institute co-host this side event to showcase the actions of mainstream US businesses, including those who have signed the American Business Act on Climate Pledge, and are members of the C2ES Business Environmental Leadership Council, a group of 30 companies with a combined $2.3 trillion in revenue and over 3 million employees that support mandatory climate policy and are acting to reduce emissions. See our business statement applauding the Paris Agreement.

Speakers

Cathy Woollums
Senior Vice President, Environmental Services and Chief Environmental Counsel
Berkshire Hathaway Energy

Nanette Lockwood
Global Director, Policy and Advocacy
Ingersoll Rand

Kevin Rabinovitch
Global Sustainability Director
Mars Incorporated

Tamara “TJ” DiCaprio
Senior Director of Environmental Sustainability
Microsoft

Eric Holdsworth
Senior Director, Climate Programs
EEI

Moderator: Elliot Diringer
Executive Vice President
C2ES

Post-Election: The Outlook for U.S. Climate Policy

November 16, 2016
6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
IETA Pavilion, Blue Zone

U.S. policymakers and business leaders will provide their perspectives on what this pivotal election means for climate progress in Washington and at the state level. 

Speakers

Nathaniel Keohane
Vice President, Global Climate
Environmental Defense Fund

Josh Klein
Senior Professional Staff
Senate Foreign Relations Committee 

Matt Rodriquez
Secretary for Environmental Protection
California

Cathy Woollums
Senior Vice President, Environmental Services and Chief Environmental Counsel
Berkshire Hathaway Energy

Elliot Diringer
Executive Vice President, C2ES
 
Reception: Business-Driven Diplomacy
 
November 16, 2016
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.
U.S. Center, Blue Zone
 
Reception at the U.S. Center recognizing the role of the private sector in addressing climate change and reducing GHG emissions. Attendees are expected to include delegates from the EU, Umbrella Group, and developing countries, as well as business and industry representatives from around the world, environmental NGOs and academia. It will feature remarks by U.S. delegation official TBD, Elliot Diringer (C2ES), and Dirk Forrester (IETA).
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