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Webinar -- The Business of Pricing Carbon

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Free webinar

The Business of Pricing Carbon:
How Companies are Preparing for Risks and Opportunities

September 12, 2017, 10 - 11 a.m. ET

 

Increasingly, companies across sectors and geographies are turning to an internal carbon price as one tool to help them reduce carbon emissions, mitigate climate-related business risks, and identify opportunities in the transition to a low-carbon economy. This C2ES public webinar discusses different internal carbon pricing approaches and reviews key opportunities, benefits, experiences, and challenges drawn from the C2ES brief, The Business of Pricing Carbon: How Companies are Pricing Carbon to Mitigate Risks and Prepare for a Low-Carbon Future.
 
Speakers
 
Anirban Ghosh
Chief Sustainability Officer, The Mahindra Group
 
Bob Stout
Vice President & Head of Regulatory Affairs, BP America
 
Liz Willmott
Environmental Sustainability Program Manager, Microsoft Corporation
 
Manjyot Bhan Ahluwalia
Policy and Business Fellow, C2ES

 

Webinar: TheBusiness of Pricing Carbon, Sept. 12, 2017

 

Getting Down to Business: Corporate Climate Leadership

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JPMorgan Chase & Co.270 Park Ave, 50th FloorNew York, NY 10017

building image

Please join C2ES and JPMorgan Chase & Co. for a conversation on
business leadership on climate change at Climate Week NYC  2017

Getting Down to Business: Corporate Climate Leadership

Thursday, September 21, 2017
4 — 7 p.m.

JPMorgan Chase & Co.
270 Park Ave, 50th Floor
New York, NY 10017

 

This event is invitation-only. For information, please contact Pauline Chow at pauline.chow@jpmchase.com

Businesses are leaders in creating solutions that address climate change, while creating jobs and growing the economy. Leaders across a range of industries will discuss what's driving investment in actions that address climate change across their value chain—from reducing carbon emissions, to deploying innovative financing solutions, to investing in clean energy technologies. 

Agenda

4:00 p.m. – Registration

4:30 p.m. – Discussion
 

Welcome Remarks

Marisa Buchanan
Deputy Head of Sustainable Finance, JPMorgan Chase & Co.

 

Panel

Kevin Butt
General Manager, Environmental Sustainability, Toyota

Steve Harper
Global Director, Environment and Energy Policy, Intel

Erin Robert
Head of Capital Strategies, JPMorgan Sustainable Finance

Bjorn Otto Sverdrup
Senior Vice President, Sustainability, Statoil ASA

Moderator
Bob Perciasepe
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

5:45 p.m. – Reception

Additional speakers may be announced here

 

JPMorgan Chase seeks to comply with applicable rules concerning meals, gifts and entertainment offered to public officials and employees, including related disclosure requirements. We estimate the cost of hospitality to be provided at Getting Down to Business: Corporate Climate Leadership to be $53 per person. To the extent you wish to pay the cost of, or to decline, the hospitality to be provided at this event please contact Pauline Chow (pauline.chow@jpmchase.com, 212-270-3307) to make the necessary arrangements.

Why clean innovation makes business sense

Microsoft clean innovation panel

Left to right: Bob Perciasepe, President, C2ES; Seth Roberts, Global Director, Energy & Climate Change, The Dow Chemical Company; Michelle Patron, Director, Sustainability Policy, Microsoft; Peter Fuller, Vice President, Market & Regulatory Policy, NRG Energy; Paul Steffes, CEO and President, Steffes Corporation. Photo courtesy of Microsoft.

Companies have discovered that finding innovative ways to procure, generate, and store energy not only helps them meet their emissions goals, but also reduces energy costs.

That’s why the private sector is leading the charge to invest in clean technology as companies seek to engage suppliers through supply chains, increase competitiveness, gain access to new markets, and diversify to prepare for long-term decarbonization.

Reducing energy use at data centers has become a priority for Microsoft, as the company continues to expand its operations. Michelle Patron, Microsoft’s director of sustainability policy recently told an event co-sponsored with C2ES that the company considers this both a responsibility and opportunity.

Microsoft is using cloud computing and advanced analytics to meet its goal of procuring 50 percent of its data center energy from solar, wind, and hydropower by 2018, and 60 percent by the early 2020s. By using sensors to accurately collect and process real-time energy use data, Microsoft has reduced energy consumption by 15 percent in 125 buildings across its 88-acre Redmond, Washington, campus. The advanced data collection has also saved the company $10 million a year on energy.

Microsoft is also showing leadership in the drive to obtain more energy from renewable sources. A recent agreement with Seattle-area utility Puget Sound Energy (PSE) allows Microsoft to directly procure renewable energy in the region, rather than buying energy from PSE, which generates most of its power from fossil fuels. In return, Microsoft has committed to buying more renewable energy than required under Washington state’s current renewable portfolio standard. To make the deal beneficial for all ratepayers, Microsoft paid a $24 million transition fee that will be distributed back to PSE customers. The company will also continue to make payments to PSE’s energy efficiency and low-income assistance programs.

The Dow Chemical Company is also a leader in procuring renewable energy. Seth Roberts, the company’s global director for energy and climate change, told the gathering that the company has committed to supplying its Texas facilities with 350 MW of wind energy—equivalent to the electricity needed to power nearly 50,000 homes. Roberts pointed out that this would have not been possible a decade ago, when renewable energy prices were not competitive with fossil-fuels and natural gas in Texas.

On the production side, Roberts said the company is making insulation that goes into lighter, fuel-efficient cars. It’s also providing reverse osmosis technologies for water purification that use 30 percent less energy than other filtration technologies.

Peter Fuller, NRG Energy’s vice president of market and regulatory policy, said his company is making a significant investment in carbon capture, use and storage at the 240 MW Petra Nova project near Houston. As the world’s largest carbon capture project at an existing power plant, the facility captures more than 90 percent of carbon dioxide emissions and sequesters 1.6 million tons of CO2 annually.

Fuller said NRG is on track to meet its science-based goals of 50 percent reduction of absolute emissions from 2014 levels by 2030, and 90 percent reduction by 2050. The company had already reduced its emissions 36 percent by 2016.

Steffes Corporation, a North Dakota based manufacturer of residential and commercial electric thermal storage equipment, serves more than 200 electric utilities across the United States and Canada. “Thermal energy storage is an extremely efficient and cost-effective way of storing energy and managing the grid of the future,” said CEO and president Paul Steffes.

The company’s devices include ceramic storage units that can store 15 to 500 kilowatts of energy. Steffes uses tools such as Microsoft Azure to process big data in real time for more predictable energy regulation and greater integration of renewables, saving consumers money, reducing emissions, and contributing to a cleaner grid.

While climate change is one of the most pressing global problems, these companies have demonstrated that it also presents to them an opportunity to be a part of the solution by investing in clean technology that is good for business as well.

Video: Why Clean Innovation Makes Business Sense
July 19, 2017 at the Microsoft Innovation and Policy Center


 

Webinar – Understanding California’s Extended Cap-and-Trade Program

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Watch the webinar recording.

Understanding California’s Extended Cap-and-Trade Program

August 10, 2017, 1 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. EDT

California's legislature voted in July to extend the state’s cap-and-trade program through 2030 in a bipartisan vote. Cap and trade is a key part of California’s plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030. The new law makes changes to the post-2020 carbon market. This webinar will discuss how the program has changed, how concerns were addressed, and what's next for compliance.

Watch the Webinar Recording

Speakers

Aimee Barnes
Senior Advisor, Office of the Governor of California

Katie Sullivan
Managing Director, International Emissions Trading Association (IETA)

Janet Peace
Senior Vice President, Policy and Business Strategy, C2ES

 

 

Clean Innovation: Why it Makes Business Sense

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Microsoft Innovation & Policy Center901 K Street, NW, 11th FloorWashington, DC 20001Watch video of this event

Please join Microsoft and the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) for a conversation on Clean Innovation: Why it Makes Business Sense. The discussion will bring together stakeholders from industry, government and civil society to discuss the business drivers for innovation in clean energy and low-carbon technologies across a broad range of industries.

U.S. companies are leading the world in developing new products and solutions that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help support the economy including new, more efficient industrial technologies; alternative vehicles and transportation systems; renewable energy; and carbon capture and sequestration. The panel will explore the business drivers and challenges associated with clean innovation across multiple sectors and geographies.  These issues include growing customer demand, competitiveness concerns, cost pressures, efficiency gains and enhanced performance.  

Wednesday, July 19 • 10:00 am – 11:30 am • Light refreshments provided.

Watch the video here

OPENING REMARKS BY:

U.S. Representative Kevin Cramer (ND – At large)
Member, House Committee on Energy and Commerce

A DISCUSSION FEATURING:

Bob Perciasepe – Moderator 
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES)

Peter Fuller 
Vice President, Market & Regulatory Policy, NRG Energy

Michelle Patron 
Director, Sustainability PolicyMicrosoft

Seth Roberts
Global Director, Energy & Climate ChangeThe Dow Chemical Company

Paul Steffes 
CEO and President, Steffes Corporation

Click to Register

Follow the discussion on Twitter:  #CleanInnovation

Event Location: Microsoft Innovation & Policy Center 
901 K Street, NW, 11th Floor, Washington, DC 20001 

This event has been planned to comply with the requirements of the Legislative and Executive Branch gift rules. Executive Branch personnel wishing to attend should consult with their designated Agency Ethics Office.

 

 

Video: July 19, 2017 at the Microsoft Innovation and Policy Center


 

Microgrid Momentum: Building Efficient, Resilient Power

Microgrid Momentum:
Building Efficient, Resilient Power

March 2017

By Doug Vine, Donna Attanasio, and Ekundayo Shittu

Download (PDF)

Summary

Microgrids are not a traditional or typical infrastructure investment for utilities, nor has the existing electric power industry been structured to facilitate development of microgrids by non-utilities. This research paper seeks to identify financial and legal barriers to the development of microgrids and provide recommendations for overcoming them. 

Key Takeaways

  • Microgrids currently provide a tiny fraction of U.S. electricity, but their capacity is expected to more than double in the next three years.
  • Each microgrid’s unique combination of power source, customer, geography, and market can make financing these projects a challenge.
  • States can play a key role in facilitating microgrid development.
  • A clearer legal framework is needed to define a microgrid, and set forth the rights and obligations of the microgrid owner with respect to its customers and the macrogrid operator.
  • Franchise rights granted to utilities may limit microgrid developers’ access to customers.
  • Linear programming models can help microgrid project developers or energy managers tailor their proposed projects.
  • Greater dialogue among all stakeholders is needed to develop supportive frameworks and policies.

Video

Watch our March 8, 2017 discussion at Geoge Washington University.

 
Donna Attanasio
Doug Vine
Ekundayo Shittu
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Innovation to Power the Nation (and the World): Reinventing our Climate Future

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1:00-3:00 p.m.Carnegie Institution for Science Auditorium 1530 P St. NW Washington , DC 20005Watch video of the event  

Innovation is an essential component to meet the challenges of climate change. Better ways to produce, store, conserve, and transmit energy will help the U.S. and other nations meet the ambitious goals set at the United Nations climate change conference held in Paris in December 2015.

Join the Director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Michelle K. Lee, and a panel of technology, energy, and climate experts for a discussion on how present and future innovation can change the course of our planet’s future. Questions to explore will include:

  • What do we need do more, do differently, do faster, to change course and evolve our energy system to be clean, efficient, accessible, dependable and low-carbon?
  • Where do we need breakthroughs in technology to really make a difference?
  • What policies would help drive the innovation we need? What business model innovation is needed?

June 29, 2016
1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Carnegie Institution for Science Auditorium
1530 P St. NW Washington , DC 20005

Watch video of the event

 

Keynote Address

Hon. Michelle K. Lee
Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office
 
Panelists

Dr. B. Jayant Baliga
Director, Power Semiconductor Research Center, North Carolina State University
National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductee, 2016, Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor
 

Nate Hurst
Chief Sustainability & Social Impact Officer, HP

Dr. Kristina Johnson
Chief Executive Officer, Cube Hydro Partners   National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductee, 2015, Polarization Control Technology

Bob Perciasepe
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

Moderator: Amy Harder
Energy Reporter, The Wall Street Journal
 

See full bios of speakers

 

Beyond Paris: From Agreement to Action on Climate Change

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8:30-10 a.m.Microsoft Innovation & Policy Center901 K Street, NW, 11th Floor, Washington, DC 20001Watch video of the event

             

Beyond Paris: From Agreement to Action on Climate Change

Hosted by: Microsoft and the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

The historic Paris Agreement represents not only the culmination of years of negotiations, but also a unique moment in which businesses, cities, and heads of state from over 150 countries gathered to make their own commitments and discuss solutions to climate change.

Please join Microsoft and the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) for a lively discussion on Wednesday, April 27, 8:30-10 a.m., with senior representatives from various sectors to discuss innovative and proactive climate solutions, what Paris means four months later, and how to move from agreement to action on climate change. 

Watch video of the event

 

SPEAKERS

Robert Diamond
Special Assistant to the President and Director of Private Sector Engagement,
The White House

Elliot Diringer
Executive Vice President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

Fred Humphries
Corporate Vice President, U.S. Government Affairs, Microsoft

Tamara “TJ” DiCaprio
Senior Director of Environmental Sustainability, Microsoft

Steve Harper
Global Director, Environment and Energy Policy, Intel

Alex Liftman
Global Environmental Executive, Bank of America

Cathy Woollums
Senior Vice President, Environmental Services and Chief Environmental Counsel
Berkshire Hathaway Energy

Moderator
Bob Perciasepe

President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES)

Additional panelists may be announced.

 

Follow the discussion on Twitter: #MSFTClimateAction

Carbon Pricing and Clean Power: A Solutions Forum

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9 a..m-NoonCapitol View Conference Center101 Constitution Ave. NWNinth FloorWashington, DC 20001Watch video of Bob Perciasepe and state officials.Watch video of business leaders' discussion.

States have an array of policy options to reduce carbon emissions from power plants. In the first of a three-part clean power series, C2ES brings together state leaders and industry experts to explore market-based approaches to efficiently and effectively implementing EPA's proposed Clean Power Plan.

April 15, 2015
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Capitol View Conference Center
101 Constitution Ave. NW
Ninth Floor
Washington, DC 20001
(Doors open at 8:30 a.m.)

Watch video of Bob Perciasepe and state officials.

Watch video of business leaders' discussion.

 

Janet Coit
Director, Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management

David Paylor
Director, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality

Martha Rudolph
Director of Environmental Programs, Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment

____

Skiles Boyd
Vice President, Environmental Management and Resources, DTE Energy

Erika Guerra
Government Affairs and Corporate Social Responsibility, Holcim (US) Inc.

Kevin Leahy
Director of Energy and Environmental Policy, Duke Energy

Katie Ott
Senior Manager, Federal Government Affairs, Exelon

____

Adele Morris
Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution

Michael Wara
  Professor, Stanford Law School

Bob Perciasepe
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

Driving Energy Efficiency with IT: A Solutions Forum

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9 a.m. – Noon101 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC, 20001Watch video of the event

 

The technology works. So why aren’t we using more of it?

Join top experts in efficiency, technology, and sustainability from cities, states, and business as we explore the opportunities for “intelligent energy efficiency” under the Clean Power Plan.

Energy efficiency can be a low-cost option for states to meet targets for reducing carbon pollution from power plants.

How can networked devices and sensors, smart grids and thermostats, and energy management systems reduce waste and increase reliability when we make, transmit or use electricity? What are the barriers to using these technologies? And what can we learn from city, state and industry leaders?

Monday, May 18, 2015

9 a.m. – Noon
101 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC, 20001

Watch Video

Why Energy Efficiency is Smart for States and Business

Ralph Izzo – Chairman and CEO, PSEG

Intelligent Efficiency and the Power Sector; Options, Opportunities and Challenges

Steve Harper – Global Director, Environment and Energy Policy, Intel Corporation

Alyssa Caddle – Principle Program Manager, Office of Sustainability, EMC

Lars Kvale – Head of Business Development, APX Environmental Markets

Moderated by: Bob Perciasepe – President, C2ES

Delivering Intelligent Efficiency to Consumers – Why It Matters

Doug Scott – Vice President of Strategic Initiatives, Great Plains Institute

Katherine Gajewski – Director of Sustainability, City of Philadelphia

Jessica Burdette – Conservation Improvement Program Supervisor, Minnesota Department of Commerce

Rick Counihan – Head of Energy Regulatory and Government Affairs, Nest

Moderated by: Janet Peace – Vice President for Markets & Business Strategy, C2ES

 

To learn more:

Fact Sheet: Intelligent Efficiency: Achieving Clean Power Plan Goals

Bob Perciasepe's blog post: How can we use intelligent efficiency to reduce power sector emissions?

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