Business

Climate Solutions: How Mayors and Businesses Are Working Together

Promoted in Energy Efficiency section: 
0
NYU Wagner295 Lafayette Street, Second FloorNew York, NY 10012-9604Watch video

The U.S. Conference of Mayors
and
 Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

invite you to attend a Climate Week NYC event

Climate Solutions:
How Mayors and Businesses Are Working Together

Hosted by:

Tuesday, September 19, 2017
9:30-11:15 a.m.
NYU Wagner
295 Lafayette Street, Second Floor
New York, NY 10012-9604

Cities and businesses are partnering to address climate change head on – by reducing the emissions causing climate change and preparing for the impacts already hitting communities. We’ll discuss results of a 100-city survey quantifying the direction of local climate policy, and highlight real-world case studies of city-business climate collaboration. Join us for a candid conversation with mayors and business leaders working together to advance climate solutions across the U.S. 
 

Featuring

Tom Cochran
CEO and Executive Director, The U.S. Conference of Mayors

Mayor Javier Gonzales
Santa Fe, New Mexico

Mayor Jackie Biskupski
Salt Lake City, Utah

Mayor Frank Cownie
Des Moines

Josh Sawislak
Global Director of Resilience, AECOM

Daniel A. Zarrilli
Senior Director of Climate Policy and Programs and Chief Resilience Officer, New York City Office of the Mayor

Bob Perciasepe
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES)


The Alliance for a Sustainable Future is a partnership launched by The U.S. Conference of Mayors and the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions to strengthen cooperation between cities and businesses committed to meeting our climate and clean energy challenges.

  

Video of our Sept. 19 discussion at Climate Week NYC

Getting Down to Business: Corporate Climate Leadership

Promoted in Energy Efficiency section: 
0
JPMorgan Chase & Co.270 Park Ave, 50th FloorNew York, NY 10017

building image

Please join C2ES and JPMorgan Chase & Co. for a conversation on
business leadership on climate change at Climate Week NYC  2017

Getting Down to Business: Corporate Climate Leadership

Thursday, September 21, 2017
4 — 7 p.m.

JPMorgan Chase & Co.
270 Park Ave, 50th Floor
New York, NY 10017

 

This event was invitation-only.

Businesses are leaders in creating solutions that address climate change, while creating jobs and growing the economy. Leaders across a range of industries will discuss what's driving investment in actions that address climate change across their value chain—from reducing carbon emissions, to deploying innovative financing solutions, to investing in clean energy technologies. 

Agenda

4:00 p.m. – Registration

4:30 p.m. – Discussion
 

Welcome Remarks

Marisa Buchanan
Deputy Head of Sustainable Finance, JPMorgan Chase & Co.

 

Panel

Kevin Butt
General Manager, Environmental Sustainability, Toyota

Steve Harper
Global Director, Environment and Energy Policy, Intel

Erin Robert
Head of Capital Strategies, JPMorgan Sustainable Finance

Bjorn Otto Sverdrup
Senior Vice President, Sustainability, Statoil ASA

Moderator
Bob Perciasepe
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

5:45 p.m. – Reception

Additional speakers may be announced here

 

JPMorgan Chase seeks to comply with applicable rules concerning meals, gifts and entertainment offered to public officials and employees, including related disclosure requirements. We estimate the cost of hospitality to be provided at Getting Down to Business: Corporate Climate Leadership to be $53 per person. To the extent you wish to pay the cost of, or to decline, the hospitality to be provided at this event please contact Pauline Chow to make the necessary arrangements.

Ann McCabe and Bob Perciasepe on the Climate Leadership Awards

Statement from Ann McCabe, executive director of The Climate Registry, and Bob Perciasepe, president of the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

August 25, 2017

On EPA dropping sponsorship of Climate Leadership Awards, Conference

We were disappointed to learn today that EPA will no longer co-sponsor the annual Climate Leadership Awards and Climate Leadership Conference. We thank EPA for the unique and vital role it has played over the past seven years in supporting the awards and conference.

In light of EPA’s decision, the awards and conference co-sponsors -- the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) and The Climate Registry (TCR) – will be stepping up to ensure both events continue to thrive.

Since 2012, more than 115 recipients have been recognized for leadership in addressing climate change by reducing carbon emissions in their internal operations and supply chains, and planning for climate impacts.

The Climate Leadership Conference and awards, drawing hundreds of sustainability professionals from across the country, will go forward in Denver, Colorado, on February 28-March 2, 2018.

We believe it’s more important than ever to encourage and recognize climate action by businesses, organizations, local governments, and individuals to reduce the man-made emissions that are causing our climate to change. We’re eager for opportunities to build new partnerships to ensure the 2018 Climate Leadership Conference and Awards are better than ever.

US companies, communities rely on federal climate science

Businesses rely on government for factual, unbiased information to help them make decisions about where and how to grow.

They need U.S. Census data to see how patterns of population growth could affect the demand for goods and services. They need energy supply and demand data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration to understand this critical input to productivity.

And they need climate data to help them identify the risks climate impacts pose to their facilities, operations, and supply and distribution chains.

The National Climate Assessment -- mandated by Congress -- is one of the tools that helps companies understand and prepare for climate risks – risks that more than 90 percent of major companies recognize. The latest version (still in draft form) is the product of researchers at 13 federal agencies and has undergone rigorous, independent peer-review by a 14-member committee at the National Academies.

But the administration is disbanding the federal advisory panel that helps policymakers and private-sector officials incorporate the National Climate Assessment into long-term planning. And researchers say they are worried the findings in the final release will be altered or suppressed by administration officials who oppose federal action on climate change.

That would be a mistake.

Government officials concerned about the health and competitiveness of U.S. businesses and the U.S. economy need to know that businesses rely on unbiased federal scientific data for decision making.

Sea-level rise projections let coastal property owners choose the right amount of flood protection for their needs. Accurate counts of frost-free days help farmers understand how growing seasons are changing so they can adjust their practices. City and state governments also need reliable data to ensure infrastructure is built to last and communities are prepared for more extreme heat waves, droughts, and downpours.

It is in the interest of the U.S. economy to see strong support for science continue at the federal level.

The National Climate Assessment is a valuable tool companies and communities use to plan for the impacts of climate change. It is by no means the only government report that gives evidence of the reality of climate change. Countless observations show us that the world of today is unlike the world of our parents. The annual State of the Climate report -- edited by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists, peer-reviewed, and published in August in the scientific journal Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society --  assembles the latest observations, including:

  • 2016 was the hottest year globally on record (surpassing record-setting 2015 and 2014)
  • Global mean sea level in 2016 was the highest since satellites began making measurements
  • Arctic temperatures reached 3.5°C above 1900 levels, a new high.
  • Greenhouse gas concentrations topped 400 parts per million for the first time in at least 800,000 years

Every credible line of evidence tells us that the Earth’s climate will continue to change in mostly harmful ways. That means governments, communities, and companies need to reduce climate-altering emissions and strengthen resilience to climate change impacts we’re already experiencing and that will grow worse without emissions reduction.

To help planners and risk managers in the public and private sectors make use of existing government climate data, C2ES is hosting a webinar to discuss “Using Climate Data in the Real World.” Government scientists from NOAA and Argonne National Lab will describe the climate datasets available for public use and how climate model outputs can be “downscaled” to provide granular data relevant to resilience planners. Business representatives will share their experience using this data in real world decision-making.

The September 27 webinar is just one component of C2ES’ work to promote information-sharing and collaboration between scientists, businesses, and governments to assess climate vulnerabilities and develop resilience strategies. 

Amazon joins C2ES Business Environmental Leadership Council

Press Release
August 9, 2017

Contact: Laura Rehrmann, press@c2es.org, 703-774-5480

Amazon joins C2ES Business Environmental Leadership Council

WASHINGTON -- Amazon is joining the Business Environmental Leadership Council at the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) to work toward practical solutions to the world’s climate and energy challenges.

“Amazon has shown through words and actions that business leaders take climate change seriously,” said C2ES President Bob Perciasepe. “The company has invested in wind and solar energy to power its businesses in the United States and globally, and has expressed public policy support for the transition to a low-carbon economy.”

The C2ES Business Environmental Leadership Council, which first formed in 1998, is the largest U.S.-based association of companies solely devoted to climate-related policy and corporate strategies. It contains mainly Fortune 500 companies representing a diverse group of industries with combined revenues of over $2 trillion and over 3 million employees.

“It has never been more important to bring business leaders together with policymakers to explore pragmatic steps toward a clean energy future,” Perciasepe said. “Our council members demonstrate every day that climate action can go hand in hand with competitive excellence and success.”

Amazon was the leading corporate purchaser of renewable energy in the United States last year. To date, Amazon has announced or commenced construction of a total of 3.6 million megawatt hours (MWh) of renewable energy. The company announced earlier this year its goal to install at least 50 rooftop solar systems globally on its facilities by 2020.

More on the C2ES Business Environmental Leadership Council.

--

About C2ES: The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) is an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization working to forge practical solutions to climate change. Our mission is to advance strong policy and action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, promote clean energy, and strengthen resilience to climate impacts. We work with Fortune 500 companies to strengthen business action and business support for effective climate policy. Learn more at www.c2es.org or follow us on Twitter @C2ES_org.

 

Why clean innovation makes business sense

Microsoft clean innovation panel

Left to right: Bob Perciasepe, President, C2ES; Seth Roberts, Global Director, Energy & Climate Change, The Dow Chemical Company; Michelle Patron, Director, Sustainability Policy, Microsoft; Peter Fuller, Vice President, Market & Regulatory Policy, NRG Energy; Paul Steffes, CEO and President, Steffes Corporation. Photo courtesy of Microsoft.

Companies have discovered that finding innovative ways to procure, generate, and store energy not only helps them meet their emissions goals, but also reduces energy costs.

That’s why the private sector is leading the charge to invest in clean technology as companies seek to engage suppliers through supply chains, increase competitiveness, gain access to new markets, and diversify to prepare for long-term decarbonization.

Reducing energy use at data centers has become a priority for Microsoft, as the company continues to expand its operations. Michelle Patron, Microsoft’s director of sustainability policy recently told an event co-sponsored with C2ES that the company considers this both a responsibility and opportunity.

Microsoft is using cloud computing and advanced analytics to meet its goal of procuring 50 percent of its data center energy from solar, wind, and hydropower by 2018, and 60 percent by the early 2020s. By using sensors to accurately collect and process real-time energy use data, Microsoft has reduced energy consumption by 15 percent in 125 buildings across its 88-acre Redmond, Washington, campus. The advanced data collection has also saved the company $10 million a year on energy.

Microsoft is also showing leadership in the drive to obtain more energy from renewable sources. A recent agreement with Seattle-area utility Puget Sound Energy (PSE) allows Microsoft to directly procure renewable energy in the region, rather than buying energy from PSE, which generates most of its power from fossil fuels. In return, Microsoft has committed to buying more renewable energy than required under Washington state’s current renewable portfolio standard. To make the deal beneficial for all ratepayers, Microsoft paid a $24 million transition fee that will be distributed back to PSE customers. The company will also continue to make payments to PSE’s energy efficiency and low-income assistance programs.

The Dow Chemical Company is also a leader in procuring renewable energy. Seth Roberts, the company’s global director for energy and climate change, told the gathering that the company has committed to supplying its Texas facilities with 350 MW of wind energy—equivalent to the electricity needed to power nearly 50,000 homes. Roberts pointed out that this would have not been possible a decade ago, when renewable energy prices were not competitive with fossil-fuels and natural gas in Texas.

On the production side, Roberts said the company is making insulation that goes into lighter, fuel-efficient cars. It’s also providing reverse osmosis technologies for water purification that use 30 percent less energy than other filtration technologies.

Peter Fuller, NRG Energy’s vice president of market and regulatory policy, said his company is making a significant investment in carbon capture, use and storage at the 240 MW Petra Nova project near Houston. As the world’s largest carbon capture project at an existing power plant, the facility captures more than 90 percent of carbon dioxide emissions and sequesters 1.6 million tons of CO2 annually.

Fuller said NRG is on track to meet its science-based goals of 50 percent reduction of absolute emissions from 2014 levels by 2030, and 90 percent reduction by 2050. The company had already reduced its emissions 36 percent by 2016.

Steffes Corporation, a North Dakota based manufacturer of residential and commercial electric thermal storage equipment, serves more than 200 electric utilities across the United States and Canada. “Thermal energy storage is an extremely efficient and cost-effective way of storing energy and managing the grid of the future,” said CEO and president Paul Steffes.

The company’s devices include ceramic storage units that can store 15 to 500 kilowatts of energy. Steffes uses tools such as Microsoft Azure to process big data in real time for more predictable energy regulation and greater integration of renewables, saving consumers money, reducing emissions, and contributing to a cleaner grid.

While climate change is one of the most pressing global problems, these companies have demonstrated that it also presents to them an opportunity to be a part of the solution by investing in clean technology that is good for business as well.

Video: Why Clean Innovation Makes Business Sense
July 19, 2017 at the Microsoft Innovation and Policy Center


 

New research highlights flood risks from sea-level rise

Recent scientific studies on the impacts of sea-level rise can help cities and businesses in coastal areas strengthen their climate resilience planning.  

Coastal flooding is expected to be a particularly costly climate impact. As the seas rise, U.S. cities from Miami to Atlantic City, New Jersey, now routinely deal with tidal flooding, also called nuisance flooding or sunny day flooding. But higher sea levels can also magnify flooding from more rare major storms like hurricanes.

Researchers at Princeton and Rutgers recently took into account the fact that coastal cities face this combination of small (high-probability) and large (low-probability) flooding events. They took observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) tide gauges and used statistical techniques to measure the occurrence of historically low- and high-probability events across coastal locations. They then used sea-level rise projections to understand how the frequency of low- and high-probability events would change at each location.

The key insight from this study is that sea-level rise will have a different impact on flooding patterns in different regions of the country. Charleston, South Carolina, will see a larger increase in moderate floods than in severe floods (though both types of floods will increase), while Seattle will see the opposite pattern.

The study also demonstrates that flood frequencies will increase dramatically in many coastal areas by 2050. The blue and green dots in the maps below show the places where flood frequencies will increase by hundreds or even thousands of times from today (Alaska and Hawaii were also modeled in the study, but not shown in this map. The full dataset is here).


Source: Princeton University, 2017.

It’s no wonder, then, that cities and businesses across the country are taking steps to prepare for flooding and other climate change risks. We continue to urge them to work together to find the options that work best for the community overall. 

A year after a devastating flood, lessons in building resilience

Nearly one year after a devastating flood in Ellicott City, Maryland, shoppers pass by reopened businesses and shuttered ones in the same block of historic Main Street.

Nearly a year after a devastating flood, business is bustling again along Main Street in Ellicott City, Maryland, but signs of the disaster remain. Just steps away from shops with flags flying and doors open are others with “space available” signs and boarded-up windows. Construction equipment sits at the corner.

Climate change is increasing the odds that communities across the United States will face similar risks. To withstand these disasters, communities must become more resilient, and a C2ES report offers ways for state and local governments to help.

On July 30, 2016, more than six inches of rain fell in two hours in a low-lying area in central Maryland bounded by two rivers. Water gushed down a historic Ellicott City street lined with antique shops, art galleries, boutiques, and restaurants. The flood damaged 90 businesses and caused more than $22 million in damages to infrastructure.

The economic damage didn’t stop there. The county where Ellicott City is located lost between $42 million and $67 million in economic activity and as much as $1.3 million in tax revenues because of the flood.

With the help of loans from the state and private donations, more than 90 percent of the damaged businesses have reopened, and some new ones are moving in.

The National Weather Service classified the storm as a thousand-year rainfall event – meaning that scientists using historic data calculate a one-in-a-thousand chance of an event like this occurring each year. But as the climate keeps changing, the odds of seeing extreme weather go up, increasing the risks to communities and businesses throughout the country.

Almost 40 percent of small businesses nationwide never reopen their doors following a disaster event. Those closings can have an especially big impact; small businesses account for more than half of U.S. sales and jobs.

Small business owners often are unaware of their climate risks and lack the time and resources to prepare for the impacts. Fewer than half of Maryland small businesses that replied to a C2ES survey said they knew about climate risks. Most said they lacked resources to learn about them, and that available resources do not directly address local risks most relevant to them.

But state and local governments in Maryland and elsewhere can help their small businesses become more climate-resilient by following the recommendations in C2ES’s framework for engagement.

When engaging with small businesses on weather and climate resilience, the C2ES framework recommends state and local officials:

1.    Use trusted messengers to convey climate information. These include organizations that small businesses frequently interact with, like city or county chambers of commerce, trade associations, and other business organizations.

2.    Leverage existing channels of communication. State agencies and local agencies often already interact with businesses on preparedness, emergency planning, flood management, long-term planning, and economic development. Climate resilience information can be incorporated into these interactions. Likewise, existing resilience efforts can be broadened to include the business community.

3.    Identify new opportunities. New programs and information can be developed on small business resilience, such as public-private partnerships and business resilience networks. Training materials and other resources can be distributed via trusted messengers.

4.    Distribute targeted information. Businesses need more information on what they can realistically do to become more resilient to extreme weather and climate change. Sector- and location-specific information can help businesses better understand their risks and opportunities for enhancing resilience. 

The extreme weather risk to communities like Ellicott City will only increase as the Earth’s atmosphere continues to warm from rising greenhouse gas emissions. But state and local governments have opportunities to open new channels of communication to help small businesses become more climate resilient and able to survive disasters.

State of the Art: Innovations in CO2 Capture and Use

Promoted in Energy Efficiency section: 
0
Hart Senate Office Building, Room 902Watch video

State of the Art: Innovations in CO2 Capture and Use

September 14, 2017
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Hart Senate Office Building, Room 902

120 Constitution Ave NE, Washington, DC

Imagine if carbon dioxide from power and industrial plants could be put to productive use.

U.S. companies are already investing in innovative technologies to capture and re-use carbon emissions in jet fuel, automobile seats, and other products. Aligned with objectives of the NRG COSIA Carbon XPRIZE, researchers are exploring new ways to transform carbon emissions into commercial products such as low carbon fuels and building materials.

At this free, public event, experts will provide updates on these breakthrough technologies, and lawmakers will discuss ways to speed up their deployment.

Agenda

8:30 a.m. Networking Breakfast

9 a.m. Welcome and Introductory Remarks

Bob Perciasepe
President, C2ES

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp
(D-ND)

Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse
(D-RI)

Sen. Shelley Moore Capito
(R-WV)

Sen. John Barrasso
(R-WY)

9:30 – 11 a.m. Corporate Investment in CO2 Utilization

David Greeson
Vice President of Development, NRG Energy

Al Collins
Senior Director of Regulatory Affairs, Occidental Petroleum Corporation

Christopher Romans
Senior Manager for Government Relations, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America

Moderator
Bob Perciasepe
President, C2ES

11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Next-Generation Technologies in Carbon Capture Use and Storage

Laura Nereng
Sustainability Leader for the Electronic and Energy Business Group, 3M

Dr. Marcius Extavour
Director, Energy, NRG COSIA Carbon XPRIZE

Bill Brown
Chief Executive Officer, NET Power LLC

Dr. Julio Friedmann
CEO, Carbon Wrangler, LLC

Moderator
Dr. Janet Peace
Senior Vice President for Policy and Business Strategy, C2ES

 

Watch video of the event

Bob Perciasepe on the extension of California's cap and trade program

Statement of Bob Perciasepe
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

July 18, 2017

On California’s vote to extend its cap-and-trade program:

California is showing the nation and the world how diverse interests can come together to promote cost-effective climate action.

Cap and trade gives businesses the flexibility to find the least-cost path to reduce emissions. This flexibility promotes innovation that creates new industries and jobs.

California has put hundreds of thousands of people to work in clean energy, while also cutting greenhouse gas emissions 10 percent from their peak in 2004. 

California's program is also specifically designed so that a significant portion of the revenue helps disadvantaged communities. A companion bill addresses community air quality concerns by increasing monitoring and imposing more stringent penalties on polluters. A guarantee that prices stay below a certain level ensures that Californians don’t pay more than their share for a safer climate while waiting for the rest of the country to catch up on policy action.

Particularly at a time of diminished federal leadership, California's program is a model for the rest of the country and the world. We applaud the governor and state lawmakers for their leadership.

-------

To reach a C2ES expert, contact Marty Niland at press@c2es.org.

About C2ES: The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) is an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization working to forge practical solutions to climate change. Our mission is to advance strong policy and action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, promote clean energy, and strengthen resilience to climate impacts. Learn more at www.c2es.org.

Syndicate content