Jason Ye

Summary of California’s Extension of its Cap-and-Trade Program

Summary of California’s Extension of its Cap-and-Trade Program

August 2017

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On July 26, 2017, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law a bipartisan bill that extends the state’s cap-and-trade program to 2030. Cap and trade is a key part of California’s plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030. The enacted bill makes design changes to the post-2020 carbon market, such as including a price ceiling, price containment points, additional limits to the number and location of offset credits, limits on who can set greenhouse gas emission requirements, and specifics on industry assistance factors. This document summarizes these program changes.

Jason Ye
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Strengthening Energy Efficiency Programs for Low-Income Communities

Strengthening Energy Efficiency Programs for Low-Income Communities

July 2017

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Energy efficiency programs offer an effective way to reduce energy consumption and address energy burden. These programs are particularly beneficial to low-income households, which spend a higher percentage of their income on energy bills. There are many energy efficiency programs offered by states, cities, and utility companies, but often only a subset of these programs is specifically designed for and directly benefits low-income communities. This fact sheet provides an overview of how energy efficiency programs could benefit low-income communities, and how to design efficiency programs to better serve low-income communities.

Jason Ye
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Ten Myths About Intellectual Property Rights and the Montreal Protocol

Ten Myths About Intellectual Property Rights and the Montreal Protocol

April 2016
 

By Steve Seidel and Jason Ye

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This brief explores myths and facts about intellectual property rights as they are covered in the Montreal Protocol, an agreement to limit high global warming potential (GWP) gases. 

Jason Ye
Stephen Seidel
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Key Insights from a Solutions Forum on Driving Energy Efficiency with IT

Key Insights from a Solutions Forum on
Driving Energy Efficiency with IT

May 2015

By Jason Ye

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Energy efficiency is a critical component of the proposed Clean Power Plan. It offers states a least-cost pathway for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the power sector. A C2ES Solutions Forum held May 18, 2015, brought together city, state, and business leaders to explore how intelligent efficiency can drive reduced energy usage and emissions under the rule.

Among the questions C2ES discussed at this event:

  • What is intelligent efficiency and how can it reduce costs and emissions?
  • Can intelligent efficiency also help with reliability?
  • What role will energy efficiency play in the Clean Power Plan?
  • What are some cities, states and businesses doing right?
  • What role can cities, states, and businesses play together in using energy efficiency to implement the Clean Power Plan?
  • What would help cities and states use energy efficiency under the Clean Power Plan?
  • Why would a utility want to sell less of its product – electricity?

C2ES will continue the conversation with cities, states, and businesses to share insights and innovative ideas that will help us get to a clean energy future. Our third Solutions Forum on June 25 will explore innovative ways to finance clean energy technology and infrastructure.

For more information about the C2ES Solutions Forum, see: http://www.c2es.org/initiatives/solutions-forum

Energy efficiency is a critical component of the proposed Clean Power Plan. It offers states a least-cost pathway for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the power sector. The second C2ES Solutions Forum—held May 18, 2015—brought together city and state officials and business leaders to explore the potential contributions from information and communications technology (ICT) solutions to drive energy efficiency under the proposed rule. This document summarizes the answers to some of the questions C2ES explored from this event.
Jason Ye
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Key Insights from a Solutions Forum on Carbon Pricing and Clean Power

Key Insights from a Solutions Forum
on Carbon Pricing and Clean Power

April 2015

By Jason Ye

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States will have tremendous flexibility to choose how to reduce carbon emissions under the Clean Power Plan. One idea states are exploring is putting a price on carbon. The first C2ES Solutions Forum — held on April 15, 2015 — brought together legal and economic experts, state environmental directors, and business leaders to explore the potential use of market mechanisms to reduce these damaging emissions efficiently and cost-effectively.

For more information about the C2ES Solutions Forum, see: http://www.c2es.org/initiatives/solutions-forum

Key insights and highlights from the event on carbon pricing and clean power include:

  • Most economists agree that the most efficient way to address climate change is to put a price on carbon.
  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has given states tremendous flexibility to determine the best way to achieve emission targets.
  • Virtually every state is already engaged in some activity that reduces emissions.
  • Market-based options available under the proposed Clean Power Plan go beyond creating or joining a cap-and-trade program or instituting a carbon tax.
  • States and businesses generally agree that market mechanisms are a proven, least-cost way to reduce emissions.
  • States believe support from the business community will be essential to adopting market-based options.
  • State and business leaders recognize the need to talk to one another about the best way to reduce emissions.
  • States are concerned about having enough time to develop market-based policies.
  • State and company representatives see a role for EPA to help states after the Clean Power Plan is finalized. 

C2ES will continue the conversation with states and businesses to share insights and innovative ideas that will help us get to a clean energy future. Our second Solutions Forum on May 18 will explore improving energy efficiency, which reduces emissions, through information and communication technologies. Our third event on June 25 will examine how to finance clean energy technology and infrastructure.

States will have tremendous flexibility to choose how to reduce carbon emissions under the Clean Power Plan. One idea states are exploring is putting a price on carbon. The first C2ES Solutions Forum — held on April 15, 2015 — brought together legal and economic experts, state environmental directors, and business leaders to explore the potential use of market mechanisms to reduce these damaging emissions efficiently and cost-effectively. This document summarizes key insights and highlights from the event.
Jason Ye
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Preparing for Carbon Pricing: Case Studies from Company Experience: Royal Dutch Shell, Rio Tinto, and Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Preparing for Carbon Pricing: Case Studies from Company Experience: Royal Dutch Shell, Rio Tinto, and Pacific Gas and Electric Company

January 2015

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This report was prepared for the PMR Secretariat by Janet Peace, Tim Juliani, Anthony Mansell, and Jason Ye (Center for Climate and Energy Solutions—C2ES), with input and supervision from Pierre Guigon and Sarah Moyer (PMR Secretariat).

This report examines how three companies -- Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), Rio Tinto, and Royal Dutch Shell -- prepared for carbon pricing programs in the U.S. and around the globe, their experiences under carbon pricing programs, and lessons learned.

Partnership for Market Readiness, World Bank, Washington, DC. License: Creative Commons Attribution CC BY 3.0 IGO

 

Anthony Mansell
Janet Peace
Jason Ye
Timothy Juliani
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Carbon Pricing Proposals of the 113th Congress

Comparison of Carbon Pricing Proposals in the 113th Congress

December 2014

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Six proposals to put a price on carbon were introduced in the 113th Congress (2013-2014). Five would establish a carbon tax (also called a “carbon pollution fee”) and one would establish a cap-and-dividend program (a cap-and-trade program that would rebate program revenues to consumers).

This brief compares the proposals by key attributes, highlighting similarities and differences. The proposals are:

  • The Climate Protection Act of 2013 (S.332) introduced by Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Barbara Boxer (D-CA) on February 14, 2013;
  • The Managed Carbon Price Act, 2014 (H.R.4754) introduced by Rep. Jim McDermott (D-WA) on May 28, 2014;
  • The Healthy Climate and Family Security Act of 2014 (H.R.5271) introduced by Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) on July 30, 2014; and
  • America’s Energy Security Trust Fund Act of 2014 (H.R.5307) introduced by Rep. John Larson (D-CT) on July 31, 2014;
  • The American Opportunity Carbon Fee Act (S.2940), introduced by Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) and Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI) on November 19, 2014; and
  • The State Choices Act introduced (H.R.5796) by Rep. John Delaney (D-MD) on December 4, 2014.

 

Jason Ye
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Assessing the Electric Vehicle Charging Network in Washington State

Assessing the Electric Vehicle Charging Network in Washington State

September 2014

by Nick Nigro, Jason Ye, and Matt Frades

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The Washington State Legislature is interested in exploring government’s role in fostering new business models that will expand the private sector commercialization of electric vehicle (EV) charging services. This paper provides an assessment of the existing EV publicly available charging network in Washington.

 

Jason Ye
Matt Frades
Nick Nigro
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Leading by Example 2.0: How Information and Communication Technologies Help Achieve Federal Sustainability Goals


 

 

 


 

 




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Introduction

As the nation’s largest landlord, employer, fleet operator, and purchaser of goods and services, the federal government has the opportunity, if not the responsibility, to lead by example in moving our country in a more economically efficient and environmentally sustainable direction. Faced with tightening budgets, agencies are looking for new ways to reduce costs and increase productivity, while at the same time meeting a growing list of congressional and executive mandates to consume less energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
 

Jason Ye
Stephen Seidel
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