America’s Pledge can drive and tally U.S. climate action

Today, Gov. Jerry Brown and Michael Bloomberg are launching America’s Pledge—an initiative to compile and quantify the actions of U.S. states, cities and businesses to drive down their greenhouse gas emissions consistent with the goals of the Paris Agreement.

America’s Pledge will for the first time aggregate and quantify the commitments of these “non-state actors,” demonstrating to the international community that U.S. climate resolve remains strong despite President Trump’s decision to withdraw from Paris.

The ambitious initiative also will provide a roadmap for increased ambition, outlining steps these groups can take to further reduce their emissions.

Since the president’s announcement, an unprecedented number of U.S. states, cities, and businesses have affirmed their support for the landmark climate deal, including through the “We Are Still In” declaration signed by more than 1,500 businesses, nearly 200 cities and counties, nine states, and over 300 universities. 

This enthusiasm for climate action is as yet unquantified, but it’s vast and varied and growing every day:

  • Just this week, California Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders released a plan to extend through 2030 California’s cap-and-trade program. The program marshals market forces to motivate investment in low-carbon solutions, drive innovation, create jobs, and cut emissions cost-effectively.
  • Also this week, Colorado announced it will be the 14th state in the newly formed U.S. Climate Alliance, whose members together represent over a third of the U.S. population and GDP. The states are committed to the U.S. meeting its Paris target of reducing emissions 26 to 28 percent from 2005 levels by 2025.
  • More than 350 Climate Mayors have adopted the Paris Agreement goals for their cities. And more than 100 U.S. cities both large and small have pledged to transition their communities to 100% clean energy.
  • About two-thirds or more of mayors who responded to a recent survey by C2ES and The U.S. Conference of Mayors said they generate or buy renewable electricity to power city buildings or operations, buy green vehicles for municipal fleets, and have energy efficiency policies for municipal buildings. And they want to partner with the private sector do more.

Weathering the Storm: How businesses are navigating a changing climate

More than 800 major weather-related disasters last year led to over $130 billion in losses worldwide. Eleven of those events each resulted in economic losses of $1 billion or more.

A new C2ES report, "Weathering the Storm: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change," examines how major global companies are beginning to assess and address the growing business risks associated with increased extreme weather and other impacts of climate change. Here’s what we found:

Leading companies are taking proactive steps to better anticipate extreme weather and climate changes, and to more quickly recover after their effects — where they see opportunities to become more efficient, reduce costs, or provide greater value to customers. Generally speaking, these companies follow a four-step process.

Weathering the Storm: How to build business resilience to climate change

From the record-breaking Black Forest wildfire in Colorado to record-low water levels for the Great Lakes, extreme weather events seem to be more the norm of late than the exception. Earlier this month, NOAA ranked 2012 as the United States’ second most costly year for damages from extreme weather events. 

The increasing financial risks associated with extreme weather have not been lost on the business community. Companies have always had to navigate a changing business environment. But now they face a changing physical environment, as climate change leads to higher sea levels and more frequent and intense heat waves, droughts, wildfires, and downpours.

A new C2ES report released today, "Weathering the Storm: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change," takes a comprehensive look at how major global companies view these rising risks and what they are beginning to do to better understand and manage them. 

The “Instability Ingredient” and Business Risk

Businesses have always had to predict and manage risks. Those risks include the potential impact of extreme weather such as floods, storms and drought on a company's supply chain, power supply, and property.

But now companies must find a way to factor in the "instability ingredient" -- climate change -- which is likely to make weather more unpredictable, extreme -- and costly -- in the future.

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Business and government start preparing for climate impacts

Today’s Senate hearing isn’t just about the science of climate change. It’s also about the actions that need to be taken now to adapt to the reality of a changing climate. Businesses and governments each have a critical role to play in building resilient communities and economies.

Business-as-usual is already being interrupted by extreme heat, historic drought, record-setting wildfires, and flooding. Events from water shortages to floods are disrupting the supply chains for such companies as Honda, Toyota, Kraft, Nestle and MillerCoors. By the end of 2011, the United States had recorded more billion-dollar disasters than it did during all of the 1980s, totaling about $55 billion in losses.