Bonn

Climate change: A patchwork of emissions cuts

by Elliot Diringer, Executive Vice President – Published in Nature, September 2013

Climate change: A patchwork of emissions cuts

Download the article as a PDF.

Read Elliot Diringer’s article in Nature on the potential path forward for international climate talks. Below is a brief summary.
 
With the failure in recent years of international attempts to deliver a binding treaty on emissions reductions, individual countries are finding their own ways to address the issue.
 
This patchwork approach could work for climate-change mitigation, C2ES Executive Vice President Elliot Diringer says in Nature, but we need an overarching framework of rules by which progress can be measured.
 
“Much of the real work to stave off climate catastrophe must happen at home,” Diringer writes. There are encouraging signs for reaching a new international agreement, but nations are still struggling with how to build ambition into the model, to ensure that collective action does reduce global emissions overall.
 
Diringer writes that home-made national approaches can be effective for climate-change mitigation if countries agree on rules and build trust.

Published by Nature
Elliot Diringer
0

Elliot Diringer

Executive Vice President

Expertise: International climate policy, UNFCCC negotiations

Elliot Diringer is Executive Vice President of the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES). He manages day-to-day operations of C2ES and helps direct its research, policy, outreach and communications efforts. He previously served as Vice President for International Strategies at the Pew Center on Global Climate Change, C2ES’s predecessor organization, and continues to direct international programs at C2ES.

Mr. Diringer has been deeply engaged in environmental issues and policy for nearly 30 years. From 1983 to 1997, he was a reporter and editor at the San Francisco Chronicle, where he authored several award-winning environmental series and covered the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. From 1997 to 2000, he served as Director of Communications and Senior Policy Advisor at the White House Council on Environmental Quality, where he helped develop major policy initiatives, led White House press and communications strategy on the environment, and was a member of U.S. delegations to international climate change negotiations. He was later Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy White House Press Secretary, serving as a principal spokesman for President Clinton.

Mr. Diringer holds a degree in environmental studies from Haverford College and was a Nieman fellow at Harvard University, where he studied environmental law and policy.

 

 


 

Syndicate content