May 2004 E-Newsletter

In This Issue:

 


"THE DAY AFTER TOMORROW": COULD IT REALLY HAPPEN?

"The Day After Tomorrow," a new movie being released this Friday, May 28, is loosely based on the theory of "abrupt climate change." As a result of global warming, the Gulf Stream (part of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation) shuts down. The North Atlantic region starts to cool while heat builds up in the tropics. The result is a severe storm, the likes of which have never been seen, and a dramatic change in the global climate. Could it really happen?

 


GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND COAL'S FUTURE

Eileen Claussen recently spoke at the American Coal Council's Spring Forum in Dallas, Texas. Her message was simple: Coal's place in the U.S. and global energy mix in the decades to come will depend largely on the industry's ability to develop the technologies that will allow us to achieve dramatic reductions in carbon emissions from coal generation. Read the speech.

 


THE 10-50 SOLUTION: A DECADE-BY-DECADE APPROACH

Roughly 100 government, business and environmental community leaders and climate-change experts participated in a Pew Center workshop to develop a long-term vision for a low-carbon economy within 50 years. Discussions covered the technologies, industrial processes and government policies needed in the short and medium term to achieve it.

Eileen Claussen recently spoke about the workshop at the 2004 EnvironDesign8 Conference in Minneapolis (May 18, 2004)

 


IMPACTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE U.S.: NEW REPORTS

A new Pew Center report, "A Synthesis of Potential Climate Change Impacts on the United States," details the possible effects of global climate change on health, natural resources and various economic sectors of the United States.

A new Pew Center report, "U.S. Market Consequences of Global Climate Change," gives an in-depth analysis of the potential effects of climate change on the U.S. economy.

 


NEW CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAMS IN THE STATES

In the absence of action at the federal level, many states are taking the lead in curbing GHG emissions. For example:

  • Massachusetts Governor Romney released the state's new Climate Protection Plan, which identifies several near-term actions the state will take to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. (May 2004)
     
  • The Connecticut legislature passed a bill establishing a state goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2010, to 10 percent below 1990 levels by 2020, and eventually to a level 75 to 80 percent below current levels. (May 2004)
     
  • Washington Governor Locke signed into law a bill requiring new fossil fueled power plants in the state to offset 20 percent of their CO2 emissions (with outside projects that reduce emissions). (March 2004)
     
  • The New Mexico legislature passed a bill requiring the state's utilities to generate at least 5 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2006. (March 2004)

To learn more about these and other steps taken at the state level.

 


CLIMATE CHANGE ACTIVITIES IN THE U.S.: 2004 UPDATE

An updated report, "Climate Change Activities in the U.S., 2004 Update," details recent steps taken to address climate change in Congress, the states and in the business community.

 


UPCOMING REPORTS

"Coping with Climate Change: The Role of Adaptation in the United States"
Expected Release: June 2004