DC Fast Charging Network in Washington State

DC fast charging is available along much of the Interstate 5 corridor and in King County, but not in most of the rest of the state. These maps were created to assess the DC fast charging network in Washington as part of a project for the Washington State Legislature.

The first map has three layers:

  1. Electric vehicle (EV) registrations by county. Click on a county to see the number of battery electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles registered in that county as of December 2013.
  2. Roadway usage by number of vehicles. Traffic volumes are colored green, yellow, and red, depending on the average daily traffic in 2012. Click on a road to see the route identifier and average daily vehicles for that road segment.
  3. DC fast charging locations. The orange color becomes darker as more stations overlap, indicating the density of charging locations in an area. Click on each location to see the ZIP code, number of charging ports, and the charging network for that location.

Large segments of many major roadways do not have any publicly available DC fast charging. These charging locations are concentrated in the Puget Sound region, with some stations located along U.S. 2, Interstate 90, and Interstate 5. AeroVironment and Blink make up over 60 percent of the DC fast charging locations. Blink Network stations are concentrated in King County while AeroVironment Network stations are spread throughout 10 counties.

 

Source: Washington State Department of Licensing, U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuel Data Center

The second map shows charging access and the ability to travel throughout the state using the public charging network. As explained here, the size of the circles around charging locations demonstrates the expected range after charging a vehicle at that location. The overlap of several locations represented by a darker shade of orange indicates a greater likelihood that a charging location will be available in that area.

This map contains three layers:

  1. Roadway usage by number of vehicles. Traffic volumes are colored green, yellow, and red depending on the average daily traffic in 2012. Click on a road to see the route identifier and average daily vehicles for that road segment.
  2. Locations of DC fast charging stations categorized by charging network. Click on each location to get the ZIP code, number of charging ports, and the charging network for that location.
  3. Driving radius from a charging station. The circles are each 40 miles wide – the distance an EV driver can expect to travel after charging for about 30 minutes. Click on each location to get the ZIP code, number of charging ports, and the charging network for that location.

King County (Seattle) has the largest concentration of stations, with one-third of the state’s total charging locations, accounting for 30 percent of total charging ports. The Blink Network operates nine locations or 64 percent of the total, while three are operated by Nissan dealerships. The dark orange circles indicate significant redundancy in charging locations within the expected range of a DC fast charging station. As a result, drivers will likely have more confidence that a DC fast charging station in and around King County will be available when needed, although the large number of EVs in King County could lead to wait times.

 

Source: Washington State Department of Licensing, U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuel Data Center