AC Level 2 Charging Network in Washington State

The AC Level 2 charging network in Washington provides access in King County, but does not provide access in much of the rest of the state outside Vancouver. The two maps on this page were created to assess the Level 2 charging network in Washington as part of a project for the Washington State Legislature.

The first map has three layers:

  1. Electric vehicle (EV) registrations by county. Click on a county to see the number of battery electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles registered in that county as of December 2013.
  2. Roadway usage by number of vehicles. Traffic volume are colored green, yellow, and red depending on the average daily traffic in 2012. Click on a road to see the route identifier and average daily vehicles for that road segment.
  3. Level 2 charging locations. The orange color becomes darker as more stations overlap, indicating the density of charging locations in an area. Click on each location to see the ZIP code, number of charging ports, and the charging network for that location.

Even though Washington has one of the most extensive Level 2 charging networks in the United States, it may not be enough to accommodate the current EV fleet in the state. There are 418 Level 2 charging locations with 893 charging ports. There are 19 EVs for every Level 2 public charging location or 9 EVs for every Level 2 charging port. The ratio indicates far less public charging is available than studies have suggested would be necessary to provide adequate public charging service. For example, the National Research Council’s 2013 report Transitions to Alternative Vehicles and Fuels assumed a public Level 2 charging station would be needed for 2.5 EVs.

Source: Washington State Department of Licensing, U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuel Data Center

The second map shows charging access and the ability to travel throughout the state using the public charging network. As explained here, the size of the circles around charging locations demonstrates the expected range after charging a vehicle at that location. The overlap of several locations represented by a darker orange color indicates a greater likelihood that a charging location will be available in that area.

This map contains three layers:

  1. Roadway usage by number of vehicles. Traffic volumes are colored green, yellow, and red depending on the average daily traffic in 2012. Click on a road to see the route identifier and average daily vehicles for that road segment.
  2. Locations of Level 2 charging stations categorized by charging network. Click on each location to get the ZIP code, number of charging ports, and the charging network for that location.
  3. Driving radius from a charging station. The circles are each 28 miles wide – the distance an EV driver can expect to travel after charging for about 90 minutes. Click on each location to get the ZIP code, number of charging ports, and the charging network for that location.

King County contains 57 percent of the Level 2 locations, where only 28 percent of the state’s population live. Part of this additional charging may be explained by a 9 percent jump in population during the workday from commuters. More likely, however, is the fact that the county is home to 55 percent of registered EVs. The map shows drivers in King County have numerous access points to Level 2 charging stations. The deep orange color indicates there are redundant charging locations in the same area improving the likelihood a driver can access a public charging station. The map only conveys access, however, meaning drivers may be required to wait to charge if utilization at these stations is high.

Source: Washington State Department of Licensing, U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuel Data Center