Climate Compass Blog

‘Business of Innovating’: Keys to success

This blog post is co-authored by Engelina Jaspers, Vice President, Sustainability at HP

How can we address climate change and achieve robust economic growth? Innovation in low-carbon technologies is critical, and businesses are the engines of innovation. With this in mind, we—the C2ES and HP—set out to explore how leading companies successfully execute low-carbon innovation strategies, with the aim of sharing lessons learned.  Today we release the key findings in a new report, The Business of Innovating: Bringing Low-Carbon Solutions to Market, which will also be the focus of a conference in Atlanta on October 25-26.

Our partnership leveraged the insights and expertise of C2ES staff, members of the Center’s Business Environmental Leadership Council (BELC), and HP’s commitment to applying innovative technologies and approaches to environmental challenges. The report’s author, Andrew Hargadon, Professor at University of California, Davis’ Graduate School of Management, studied the BELC members and other leading companies, including an in-depth study of eight low-carbon solutions from HP and three other companies: Alstom, Daimler and Johnson Controls. The report outlines the barriers particular to low-carbon innovation efforts and provides a set of seven practical lessons for companies.

Global Warming Contributing to Texas Drought

This blog is co-written by Jay Gulledge

Recently, President Obama quipped about GOP presidential candidate and Texas governor Rick Perry: “You’ve got a governor whose state is on fire denying climate change.” While this type of election jousting risks further politicizing an issue that should be totally non-partisan, it raises a legitimate question: Is climate change increasing the risk of drought and wildfires in Texas?

Solar Decathletes Bring Homebuilding Talents to Washington, D.C.

Over the past few weeks, college students have been shedding light on the future of solar energy on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Out of 19 teams from around the globe and 10 energy performance and livability contests, one overall winner emerged at the recently held U.S. Department of Energy 2011 Solar Decathlon. The winning WaterShed home design, built by students from the University of Maryland, was inspired by the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The house included a 9.2 kilowatt rooftop solar array and prominently featured storm water management and recycling components, such as a butterfly roof and pollution filtration.

EPA’s Endangerment Finding: Standing Tall

Last year, Senator James Inhofe, a staunch opponent of EPA’s authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions, asked the EPA’s Inspector General (IG) to investigate the agency’s endangerment finding related to climate change. The IG’s report was released earlier this week, and its first sentence reads, “EPA met statutory requirements for rulemaking and generally followed requirements and guidance related to ensuring the quality of the supporting technical information.” In his statement on the report, Senator Inhofe translated that to, “This report confirms that the endangerment finding is ….. rushed, biased, and flawed.”

Flood Damages Stacking Up in Northeast

With the Northeast still reeling from the impacts of Hurricane Irene, the possibility of even more flooding was almost too much to comprehend. But last week the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee stalled and sent plumes of precipitation toward the Northeast, creating a replay of the floods a few weeks earlier. This time the area along the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania and New York was in the bulls-eye. Since the ground was still saturated from Irene, this new round of flooding was worse, surpassing the previous record event set in 1972 when Hurricane Agnes dropped a torrential downpour on the area.