Initiatives

Leveraging Natural Gas Webinar Series

C2ES held a series of webinars from June-August 2013 to explore sector-specific opportunities for low-emitting natural gas use. Slides and video from the webinars are available below.

  • Manufacturing: June 26, Bruce Hedman, Technical Director, Institute for Industrial Productivity. View slides here.
  • Transportation: July 10, Susan Robinson, Federal Public Affairs Director, Waste Management. View slides here.
  • Power: August 7, Branko Terzic, Executive Director, Deloitte Center for Energy Solutions. View slides here.
  • Buildings: August 14, Tom Massaro, Vice President - Marketing and Business Intelligence, New Jersey Natural Gas. View slides here.

Leading by Example 2.0: How Information and Communication Technologies Help Achieve Federal Sustainability Goals


 

 

 


 

 




Read the Report

 

Introduction

As the nation’s largest landlord, employer, fleet operator, and purchaser of goods and services, the federal government has the opportunity, if not the responsibility, to lead by example in moving our country in a more economically efficient and environmentally sustainable direction. Faced with tightening budgets, agencies are looking for new ways to reduce costs and increase productivity, while at the same time meeting a growing list of congressional and executive mandates to consume less energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
 

Jason Ye
Stephen Seidel
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Natural Gas Report

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Increased natural gas use can help reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in the near to medium term, but deeper long-term reductions will require broader deployment of zero-carbon energy sources. C2ES examines ways to leverage natural gas to reduce emissions in the power, transportation, manufacturing and building sectors.
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The New York Times Energy for Tomorrow Conference: Building Sustainable Cities

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Judi Greenwald speaks about enhanced oil recovery using captured carbon dioxide April 25 in New York City at The New York Times Energy for Tomorrow Conference: Building Sustainable Cities.

Super Bowl XLVII: Playing Offense on Clean Energy

An estimated 111 million people across the United States watched at least part of last year's Super Bowl between the New York Giants and the New England Patriots. It was the most-watched event in U.S. TV history.

For those of us seeking to engage the public in the work of building a clean-energy future, sporting events offer a unique opportunity to reach the public. This year, for example, C2ES has teamed up with Entergy Corporation and the New Orleans Super Bowl XLVII Host Committee to launch a fun, environment-themed website and contest for NFL fans.

Patience and policy needed on drive toward sustainability

I recently responded to a question on the National Journal blog, "What 's holding back electric cars?"

You can read more on the original blog post and other responses at the National Journal.

Here is my response:

An energy solution with true bipartisan support

Two out of three respondents in a new University of Texas poll said energy issues are important to them. But the harsh rhetoric of campaign season makes it seem like politicians can never agree on important policies needed to provide safe, reliable and affordable energy while also protecting the environment.

Well they can, and they did. Right now in Washington, D.C., we have a bipartisan bill that would reduce carbon emissions and develop domestic energy resources.

Abundant natural gas is a game changer

I recently responded to a question on the National Journal blog, "What role should natural gas play in the United States?"

You can read more on the original blog post and other responses at the National Journal.

Here is my response:

How information technologies advance federal sustainability

As the nation’s largest landlord, fleet operator, and purchaser of goods and services, the federal government has both the opportunity and the responsibility to lead by example in moving the United States in a more sustainable direction.

Across the federal government, agencies are facing two imperatives: tighter budgets requiring them to find ways to cut costs and increasingly stringent sustainability mandates requiring them to seek out new ways to reduce their energy use and cut greenhouse gas emissions.

A C2ES report released today highlights exciting initiatives across the federal government where agencies are using information and communications technologies to meet these dual challenges.

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