Initiatives

Solutions Forum

States, cities, and companies all have a role to play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, building a clean energy economy, and strengthening resilience against increasing climate risks. In a three-part series of events, C2ES is bringing together these groups to explore opportunities and options for reducing power plant carbon emissions under the Clean Power Plan.

States have a vast array of policy options to consider. We explore how market-based approaches could be used to efficiently and effectively implement the Clean Power Plan, the role of information technology and energy efficiency, and the best models for financing clean energy technology.

Solutions Forum Events

Innovative Finance and Clean Power
June 25, 2015
States and companies are deploying tools like green bonds, clean energy banks, and energy service contracts to finance clean energy and energy efficiency. How can these tools be scaled up? What can we learn from leading states and companies and what stands in the way of further progress?

Resources:

Introduction and Discussion: A State Perspective on Clean Energy Finance
Introduction: Bob Perciasepe – President C2ES
Remarks: Kathleen Merrigan – Executive Director of Sustainability, The George Washington University
Lee Paddock – Associate Dean for Environmental Studies, The George Washington University School of Law.
Discussion: Bob Martineau, Commissioner, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.

 

Key Tools to Mobilize Clean Energy and Efficiency Investment
Andrea Colnes – Board of Directors, Coalition for Green Capital
Granville Martin – Managing Director, Sustainable Finance, JPMorgan Chase
Robert Martineau Tennessee Environment and Conservation Commissioner
Bill Tyndall – Vice President of Commercial Strategic Initiatives, Duke Energy
Moderated by: Bob Perciasepe.

Financing Energy Efficiency: Scaling Up Models that Work
Amy Brusiloff – Senior Vice President, Community Development Financial Institution Lending & Investing, Bank of America
Anna Pavlova – Vice President, Government Relations, Schneider Electric
Keith Welks – Deputy Treasurer, Pennsylvania State Treasury
Moderated by: Donna Attanasio – Senior Advisor for Energy Law Programs, The George Washington University Law School

The GW Solar Institute: A Brief Introduction
Amit Ronen – Director, The George Washington University Solar Institute

Driving Energy Efficiency with IT
May 18, 2015
C2ES brings together business, state and city leaders to explore how information technology can help achieve energy efficiency and Clean Power Plan targets.

Resources:

Why Energy Efficiency is Smart for States and Business
Introduction: Bob Perciasepe – President C2ES
Remarks & Discussion: Ralph Izzo – Chairman and CEO, PSEG

 

Intelligent Efficiency and the Power Sector; Options, Opportunities and Challenges
A discussion with Steve Harper – Global Director, Environment and Energy Policy, Intel Corporation
Alyssa Caddle – Principle Program Manager, Office of Sustainability, EMC
Lars Kvale – Head of Business Development, APX Environmental Markets

 

Delivering Intelligent Efficiency to Consumers – Why It Matters
A discussion with Doug Scott – Vice President of Strategic Initiatives, Great Plains Institute
Katherine Gajewski – Director of Sustainability, City of Philadelphia
Jessica Burdette – Conservation Improvement Program Supervisor, Minnesota Department of Commerce
Rick Counihan – Head of Energy Regulatory and Government Affairs, Nest
Moderated by: Janet Peace – Vice President for Markets & Business Strategy, C2ES

 

Carbon Pricing & Clean Power
April 15, 2015
C2ES brings together state leaders and industry experts to explore market-based approaches to efficiently and effectively implementing EPA's proposed Clean Power Plan.

Resources:

State Perspectives: Weighing the Options
Introduction: Bob Perciasepe – Presidemt, C2ES
Remarks: Adele Morris – Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution
Michael Wara – Professor, Stanford Law School

Discussion with Janet Coit – Director, Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management
David Paylor – Director, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality

Martha Rudolph – Director of Environmental Programs, Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment

 

Businesses Perspectives: Carbon Pricing in Practice
A discussion with Skiles Boyd – Vice President, Environmental Management and Resources, DTE Energy
Erika Guerra – Government Affairs and Corporate Social Responsibility, Holcim (US) Inc.
Kevin Leahy –
Director of Energy and Environmental Policy, Duke Energy

Katie Ott – Senior Manager, Federal Government Affairs, Exelon

 

Key Resources

The Earth is undoubtedly warming. What’s the cause, what are the impacts, and what can we do about it?

Scientists and analysts at the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) review the climate science basics and answer your frequently asked questions.

Below is a list of resources to learn more about the impacts of climate change, what individuals can do to help, and which policies can make a big difference

What are the Impacts of Climate Change?

The Earth is warming and will continue to do so if we keep releasing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. This warming brings an increased risk of more frequent and intense heat waves, higher sea levels, and more severe droughts, wildfires, and downpours. To learn more:

  • Tropical storms and hurricanes. A warmer world and higher sea levels will intensify the impacts of hurricanes. Learn more about the connection between hurricanes and climate change.
  • Drought. Global warming will increase the risk of drought in some regions. Warmer temperatures can increase water demand and evaporation, stressing water supplies. Learn about the links between climate change and drought.
  • Heat waves. As the Earth warms, more areas will be at risk for extreme heat waves. Learn more about the link between climate change and extreme heat, the other risks heat waves can spawn, and what’s being done to adapt.
  • Arctic melting. Warming has increased Arctic temperatures at about twice the global rate, and Arctic sea ice cover has been shrinking much faster than scientists anticipated. Our Arctic Security report explores how this can set the stage for international disputes.
  • Wildfires. The number of large wildfires and the length of the wildfire season have been increasing in recent decades. Find out how climate change will worsen wildfire conditions.
  • Heavy Precipitation. Heavy downpours and other extreme precipitation are becoming more common and are producing more rain or snow. Learn more about the link between heavy precipitation and climate change.

What can you do to help?

C2ES works to help individuals learn how they can save energy at work, school, and home. Learn some of the steps you can take to make an impact:

  • Learn your personal carbon footprint. Your daily energy use has an impact on the environment. Find out how big it is by answering a few questions about where you live and how you use energy at home and on the go. Calculate your carboin footprint now.
  • Save electricity at home. Whether you own your home or rent, there are many ways you can reduce your impact on the planet – and your electricity bills. Learn how you can Make an Impact at home.
  • Be a smarter commuter. Emissions from transportation sources represent more than a quarter of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Small changes can help reduce our collective impact. Learn how you can Make an Impact on the move.
  • Use less water. Sustainable gardening techniques can not only produce thriving yards, but can also reduce your water bills, maintenance time, and keep yard waste out of landfills. Learn how you can Make an Impact in the yard.
  • Be a smarter shopper. Our choices as consumers affect our environment. From buying local produce to using energy-saving light bulbs, each of us has the power to make a difference. Learn how you can Make an Impact at the store.
  • Work sustainably. For many companies, reducing emissions helps both the environment and the bottom line. Learn how you can Make an Impact at work.

What would make a huge difference?

Sensible policies can spur demand for clean energy and technologies and reduce carbon emissions cost-effectively. Learn about some of the options:

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Key Insights from a Solutions Forum on Driving Energy Efficiency with IT

Key Insights from a Solutions Forum on Driving Energy Efficiency with IT

May 2015

Download the Key Insights (PDF)

Energy efficiency is a critical component of the proposed Clean Power Plan. It offers states a least-cost pathway for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the power sector. A C2ES Solutions Forum held May 18, 2015, brought together city, state, and business leaders to explore how intelligent efficiency can drive reduced energy usage and emissions under the rule.

Among the questions C2ES discussed at this event:

  • What is intelligent efficiency and how can it reduce costs and emissions?
  • Can intelligent efficiency also help with reliability?
  • What role will energy efficiency play in the Clean Power Plan?
  • What are some cities, states and businesses doing right?
  • What role can cities, states, and businesses play together in using energy efficiency to implement the Clean Power Plan?
  • What would help cities and states use energy efficiency under the Clean Power Plan?
  • Why would a utility want to sell less of its product – electricity?

C2ES will continue the conversation with cities, states, and businesses to share insights and innovative ideas that will help us get to a clean energy future. Our third Solutions Forum on June 25 will explore innovative ways to finance clean energy technology and infrastructure.

For more information about the C2ES Solutions Forum, see: http://www.c2es.org/initiatives/solutions-forum

Energy efficiency is a critical component of the proposed Clean Power Plan. It offers states a least-cost pathway for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the power sector. The second C2ES Solutions Forum—held May 18, 2015—brought together city and state officials and business leaders to explore the potential contributions from information and communications technology (ICT) solutions to drive energy efficiency under the proposed rule. This document summarizes the answers to some of the questions C2ES explored from this event.
Jason Ye
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Energy efficiency will play a key role in the Clean Power Plan

A new C2ES study outlines the significant role energy efficiency is expected to play in reducing carbon emissions from power plants under the proposed Clean Power Plan.

Energy efficiency can be an attractive way for states to meet the plan’s targets because, in addition to being relatively inexpensive to deploy on its own, energy efficiency reduces the need to build new, costly power plants in the future.

C2ES examined six economic modeling studies that project the likely impacts of the Clean Power Plan on the U.S. power mix and electricity prices. Despite starting with different assumptions, all of the studies project that energy efficiency will be the most used and least-cost option for states to implement the plan, and that overall electricity consumption will decline as a result.

The majority of the studies project either cost savings to power users under the Clean Power Plan or increases of less than $10 billion a year. That translates to less than $87 a year per household, or about 25 cents a day.

C2ES President Bob Perciasepe moderates a Solutions Forum panel with (l to r): Steve Harper, Global Director, Environment and Energy Policy, Intel Corporation; Alyssa Caddle, Principle Program Manager, Office of Sustainability, EMC; and Lars Kvale, Head of Business Development, APX Environmental Markets.

Our second Solutions Forum focused on how to spur more energy efficiency, especially through “intelligent efficiency” — a systems-based approach to energy management enabled through networked devices and sensors.

Carbon Pricing and Clean Power: A Solutions Forum

Promoted in Energy Efficiency section: 
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9 a..m-NoonCapitol View Conference Center101 Constitution Ave. NWNinth FloorWashington, DC 20001Watch video of the event 

States have an array of policy options to reduce carbon emissions from power plants. In the first of a three-part clean power series, C2ES brings together state leaders and industry experts to explore market-based approaches to efficiently and effectively implementing EPA's proposed Clean Power Plan.

April 15, 2015
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Capitol View Conference Center
101 Constitution Ave. NW
Ninth Floor
Washington, DC 20001
(Doors open at 8:30 a.m.)

Watch Video

Janet Coit
Director, Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management

David Paylor
Director, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality

Martha Rudolph
Director of Environmental Programs, Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment

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Skiles Boyd
Vice President, Environmental Management and Resources, DTE Energy

Erika Guerra
Government Affairs and Corporate Social Responsibility, Holcim (US) Inc.

Kevin Leahy
Director of Energy and Environmental Policy, Duke Energy

Katie Ott
Senior Manager, Federal Government Affairs, Exelon

____

Adele Morris
Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution

Michael Wara
  Professor, Stanford Law School

Bob Perciasepe
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

How can we use intelligent efficiency to reduce power sector emissions?

Nobody likes waste. And yet when we produce, distribute and use electricity, we’re wasting up to two-thirds of the energy.

Although we can’t eliminate all of these losses, we could reduce waste and increase reliability through “intelligent efficiency”— technology like networked devices and sensors, smart grids and thermostats, and energy management systems.

If we used energy more efficiently, we’d also reduce the harmful carbon dioxide emissions coming from our power plants — and reduce our electric bills.

That’s why energy efficiency is expected to be a critical, low-cost path for states looking to reduce power plant emissions under the proposed Clean Power Plan.

C2ES is pulling together top experts in sustainability, efficiency, and technology from cities, states and business to explore how we can deploy intelligent efficiency to help reach Clean Power Plan emissions targets. (RSVP for our event Monday, May 18, in Washington, D.C.)

Just as technology can instantly connect us with people across the globe or monitor our calories and whether we’re burning enough of them, we have technology that will allow us to network and monitor how we produce, deliver and consume electricity.

 

Key Insights from a Solutions Forum on Carbon Pricing and Clean Power

Key Insights from a Solutions Forum on Carbon Pricing and Clean Power

April 2015

Download the Key Insights (PDF)

 

States will have tremendous flexibility to choose how to reduce carbon emissions under the Clean Power Plan. One idea states are exploring is putting a price on carbon. The first C2ES Solutions Forum — held on April 15, 2015 — brought together legal and economic experts, state environmental directors, and business leaders to explore the potential use of market mechanisms to reduce these damaging emissions efficiently and cost-effectively.

For more information about the C2ES Solutions Forum, see: http://www.c2es.org/initiatives/solutions-forum

Key insights and highlights from the event on carbon pricing and clean power include:

  • Most economists agree that the most efficient way to address climate change is to put a price on carbon.
  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has given states tremendous flexibility to determine the best way to achieve emission targets.
  • Virtually every state is already engaged in some activity that reduces emissions.
  • Market-based options available under the proposed Clean Power Plan go beyond creating or joining a cap-and-trade program or instituting a carbon tax.
  • States and businesses generally agree that market mechanisms are a proven, least-cost way to reduce emissions.
  • States believe support from the business community will be essential to adopting market-based options.
  • State and business leaders recognize the need to talk to one another about the best way to reduce emissions.
  • States are concerned about having enough time to develop market-based policies.
  • State and company representatives see a role for EPA to help states after the Clean Power Plan is finalized. 

C2ES will continue the conversation with states and businesses to share insights and innovative ideas that will help us get to a clean energy future. Our second Solutions Forum on May 18 will explore improving energy efficiency, which reduces emissions, through information and communication technologies. Our third event on June 25 will examine how to finance clean energy technology and infrastructure.

States will have tremendous flexibility to choose how to reduce carbon emissions under the Clean Power Plan. One idea states are exploring is putting a price on carbon. The first C2ES Solutions Forum — held on April 15, 2015 — brought together legal and economic experts, state environmental directors, and business leaders to explore the potential use of market mechanisms to reduce these damaging emissions efficiently and cost-effectively. This document summarizes key insights and highlights from the event.
Jason Ye
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States should explore carbon pricing to encourage clean power

C2ES President Bob Perciasepe moderates a Solutions Forum panel with (l to r): Martha Rudolph, Director of Environmental Programs, Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment; David Paylor, Director, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality; and Janet Coit, Director, Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management.

States will have tremendous flexibility to choose how to reduce their carbon emissions under the Clean Power Plan, and one idea they should explore is putting a price on carbon.

The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) recently brought together legal and economic experts, state environmental directors, and business leaders to explore the potential to use market mechanisms to reduce these damaging emissions efficiently and cost-effectively.

Here are three key insights from this Solutions Forum:

Climate Leadership winners: Focus on your message

Photo by Ellie Ramm

Elizabeth Craig of the EPA (left) speaks with three representatives of 2015 Climate Laedership Award winners, Andy Battjes of Brown Forman, Bridgeport, Conn., Mayor Bill Finch, and Alexis Limberakis of Clorox

 

When it comes to climate leadership, the way a message is delivered can be the key to success.

Winners of the 2015 Climate Leadership Awards found that being creative in communicating ideas on sustainability and reducing greenhouse gas emissions helped the message resonate with constituents, customers, and employees.

Sixteen organizations, including C2ES Business Environmental Leadership Council members Bank of America and General Motors, won Climate Leadership Awards this year. The awards are co-sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions, Association of Climate Change Officers, and The Climate Registry.

Three winners -- Bridgeport, Conn., Mayor Bill Finch, household consumer product maker Clorox, and wine and distilled spirits manufacturer Brown Forman – spoke at the Climate Leadership Conference about three ways to connect climate goals to your audience.

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