Energy & Technology

Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Different Light-Duty Vehicle and Fuel Pathways: A Synthesis of Recent Research

Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Different Light-Duty Vehicle and Fuel Pathways: A Synthesis of Recent Research

July 2013

by Nick Nigro and Shelley Jiang

Download the full report (PDF)

Transitioning to a cleaner fleet of advanced vehicles powered by electricity, hydrogen, and advanced biofuels or petroleum products can yield a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and petroleum consumption. A meaningful assessment of the comparative merits of these alternate fuel pathways requires a solid understanding of their technological potential to reduce emissions. Available studies evaluating full lifecycle emissions rely on various assumptions of that potential and yield a wide range of results. This brief summarizes and synthesizes the results of several recent studies and presents the full range of greenhouse gas emission estimates for each type of advanced vehicle and fuel. It also explains the reasons these estimates vary so widely and identifies opportunities for future analyses that use a consistent set of scenarios with transparent assumptions in order to compare the greenhouse gas impacts of fuel and vehicle pathways.

 

Nick Nigro
Shelley Jiang
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Leveraging Natural Gas Webinar Series

C2ES held a series of webinars from June-August 2013 to explore sector-specific opportunities for low-emitting natural gas use. Slides and video from the webinars are available below.

  • Manufacturing: June 26, Bruce Hedman, Technical Director, Institute for Industrial Productivity. View slides here.
  • Transportation: July 10, Susan Robinson, Federal Public Affairs Director, Waste Management. View slides here.
  • Power: August 7, Branko Terzic, Executive Director, Deloitte Center for Energy Solutions. View slides here.
  • Buildings: August 14, Tom Massaro, Vice President - Marketing and Business Intelligence, New Jersey Natural Gas. View slides here.

Smart technologies aid federal agencies' sustainability efforts

In his speech on Tuesday laying out a national climate action plan, President Obama called on federal agencies to lead by example in taking actions to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases.

In a new report today, the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) highlights one area where the federal government is making progress, and can achieve much more.  It’s called Leading by Example 2.0: How Information and Communication Technologies Help Federal Agencies Meet Sustainability Goals.

Faced with declining budgets, federal agencies are looking for innovative ways to cut costs while meeting a growing list of sustainability mandates.  Expanding the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) – metering and energy management systems for buildings, GPS-based tools for fleets, teleconferencing, e-training, teleworking, and cloud-based data storage – offer agencies new ways to reduce their energy use, cut greenhouse gas emissions and enhance productivity.

We estimate widespread deployment of  ICT could help reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 12 percent, roughly half the amount called for under a 2009 executive order, and could save an estimated $5 billion in energy costs through 2020.

Obama will need to act on his climate plan with a sense of urgency

In his State of the Union address, President Obama promised stronger action on climate change.  Today he followed up with a credible and comprehensive plan.  The real issue now is how vigorously he follows through.

From a policy perspective, the president’s plan lacks the sweep, cohesion and ambition that might be possible through new legislation.  With Congress unwilling to act, the president instead is offering an amalgam of actions across the federal government, relying on executive powers alone.

Taken together, the actions represent the broadest climate strategy put forward by any U.S. president, addressing the need to both cut carbon emissions and strengthen climate resilience.  While many of the specific items are relatively small-bore, and quite a few are actions already underway, the plan also includes new initiatives that can significantly advance the U.S. climate effort.

Leading by Example 2.0: How Information and Communication Technologies Help Achieve Federal Sustainability Goals


 

 

 


 

 




Read the Report

 

Introduction

As the nation’s largest landlord, employer, fleet operator, and purchaser of goods and services, the federal government has the opportunity, if not the responsibility, to lead by example in moving our country in a more economically efficient and environmentally sustainable direction. Faced with tightening budgets, agencies are looking for new ways to reduce costs and increase productivity, while at the same time meeting a growing list of congressional and executive mandates to consume less energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
 

Jason Ye
Stephen Seidel
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Report Launch: "Leveraging Natural Gas to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions"

Promoted in Energy Efficiency section: 
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The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) releases a new report, "Leveraging Natural Gas to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions," outlining the climate implications of expanded natural gas use and potential uses and benefits in key sectors. C2ES President Eileen Claussen will lead a CEO-level conversation and Michael Webber, deputy director of the University of Texas Energy Institute, will lead a discussion of sector-specific recommendations for capitalizing on natural gas in power generation, buildings, manufacturing and transportation.

Featuring:

PANEL I

EILEEN CLAUSSEN
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

DARRYL BANKS
Vice President, Energy Policy, Center for American Progress

TOM FARRELL
CEO, Dominion Resources

DAVE MCCURDY
President, American Gas Association

PANEL II

MICHAEL WEBBER
Deputy Director, Energy Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Moderator

BRUCE HEDMAN
Technical Director, Institute for Industrial Productivity

THOMAS MASSARO
Vice President - Marketing and Business Intelligence, New Jersey Natural Gas

SUSAN ROBINSON
Federal Public Affairs Director, Waste Management

BRANKO TERZIC
Executive Director, Deloitte Center for Energy Solutions

12th Annual Carbon Capture Utilization & Sequestration Conference

Promoted in Energy Efficiency section: 
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Judi Greenwald will speak about ways to spur carbon capture technology development,

Judi Greenwald will speak about ways to spur carbon capture technology development,

The New York Times Energy for Tomorrow Conference: Building Sustainable Cities

Promoted in Energy Efficiency section: 
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Judi Greenwald speaks about enhanced oil recovery using captured carbon dioxide April 25 in New York City at The New York Times Energy for Tomorrow Conference: Building Sustainable Cities.

On our own?

Spring not only brings us daffodils and cherry blossoms in Washington, D.C., but also occasionally powerful thunderstorms that can knock out power to thousands of homes and businesses.

I live in one of those northern and western suburbs of DC that tend to lose power fairly frequently.

It used to be that one of the few nice things about losing power was the sound of silence. But those days are gone. Now losing power has a new sound: the whirring of the startup of my neighbors’ backup generators.

We need power not only to keep our food from spoiling and protect us from uncomfortable and even dangerous heat, but also to stay connected. As a nation, we are becoming ever more dependent on electronic devices. We cannot survive without our cell phones and computers, let alone our refrigerators and air conditioners. At the same time, climate change threatens the reliability of the grid through more intense heat waves and potentially more powerful storms.

While it’s easy to say we should work to prevent disruption in electricity, how much should we invest to bolster the resilience of the grid? And who should pay?

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