Electric Vehicles

C2ES Interactive Tool Helps State Transportation Officers Support Electric Vehicles

Press Release

January 17, 2013

Contact: Laura Rehrmann, rehrmannl@c2es.org, 703-516-0621

C2ES interactive tool helps state transportation officers support electric vehicles

WASHINGTON, D.C. – With thousands of new electric vehicles hitting the road each month, state transportation departments need to know how to integrate these transformative vehicles into the systems they manage.

That’s why the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions has developed an interactive Plug-in Electric Vehicle Action Tool, which guides state transportation officials through a variety of possible actions to foster an electric vehicle market in their state.

The tool, which C2ES developed in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Transportation and eight state transportation departments, was unveiled this week at the Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting attended by more than 11,000 transportation professionals.

Using the tool’s Actions Map, state transportation officials can chart a path, from determining their goals for plug-in electric vehicle deployment to implementing new programs and policies. The tool helps officials answer such questions as:  What should be the state’s role in deploying charging stations? What’s the best way to explain the public benefits of electric vehicles? How can we build consensus with stakeholders for action?

The tool is also a resource for learning about plug-in electric vehicles and best practices from other state agencies. Many of the suggested actions and resources are also applicable to other state agencies and local governments.

Electric vehicles offer a transformative opportunity to address energy security, air quality, climate change, and economic growth. Sales for electric vehicles rose 200 percent from 2011 to 2012. But sustained growth is needed to fully realize their benefits.

“State transportation departments are playing an important role in defining public policy that can support electric vehicle deployment,’’ said Judi Greenwald, Vice President of Technology and Innovation at C2ES. “The PEV Action Tool provides them with all the necessary information on what actions they can take – whether their state is just getting started or leading the way.”

Initially spearheaded by Washington State Department of Transportation, the project also included the state DOTs from Arizona, California, Georgia, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, and Wisconsin.

"We're very pleased the toolkit is now available to colleagues in transportation departments around the nation,’’ said Jeff Doyle, Director of Public/Private Partnerships for Washington State Department of Transportation. “We focused on making this tool relevant and useful to all states, not just those already involved in supporting electric vehicles."

For more information on the Plug-In Electric Vehicle Action Tool: http://www.c2es.org/pev-action-tool

About C2ES
The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) is an independent, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization promoting strong policy and action to address the twin challenges of energy and climate change. Launched in November 2011, C2ES is the successor to the Pew Center on Global Climate Change.

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Action Tool

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The PEV Action Tool helps state departments of transportation determine their goals for plug-in electric vehicle deployment and to chart out a path for reaching those goals. The Action Tool is also a resource for learning about plug-in electric vehicles and best practices from other state agencies. Although state departments of transportation are the primary audience, many of the suggested actions and resources in the tool are applicable to other public entities such as local governments and other state agencies.
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Plug-in Electric Vehicle Action Tool

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Action Tool

January 2013

by Charles Zhu and Nick Nigro

Download the full report (PDF)

Explore the interactive version of the PEV Action Tool

The Plug-in Electric Vehicle Action Tool is the synthesis of 2 workshops as well as research conducted by the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES). The PEV Action Tool helps state departments of transportation determine their goals for plug-in electric vehicle deployment and to chart out a path for reaching those goals. The PEV Action Tool is also a resource for learning about plug-in electric vehicles and best practices from other state agencies. Although state departments of transportation are the primary audience, many of the suggested actions and resources in the tool are applicable to other public entities such as local governments and other state agencies. 

 

 

Charles Zhu
Nick Nigro
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NARUC Passes Key Resolution to Support PEV Deployment

November 11-14, 2012 in Baltimore, Maryland

As exemplified in the PEV Action Plan, creating a consistent regulatory framework is necessary to enable a national plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market. The framework includes electricity regulatory policy related to charging infrastructure providers, electric utilities, and consumers. The framework in the PEV Action Plan also includes recommendations regarding transportation infrastructure policy and industry standards.

The key bodies to engage on electricity regulation are the state Public Utility Commissions and the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). NARUC can help set direction for states that are looking at regulatory reform, especially as it relates to alternative fuel vehicles. Ahead of its November 2012 meeting, C2ES along with the Natural Resources Defense Council and the National Governors Association participated in a webinar with public utility commissioners and related stakeholders on the importance of a regulatory framework for the alternative fuel market, including PEVs and natural gas vehicles.

At its meeting in Baltimore, NARUC took an important step toward creating this critical regulatory framework with passage of resolution that is compatible with the PEV Action Plan. The resolution aims to expand the alternative fuel vehicle market through regulatory reform and other related actions. Highlights from the resolution include:

  • NARUC urged state and federal regulators to collaborate with other policymakers to remove barriers to alternative fuel vehicle deployment and ensure consistent, fuel-neutral policies to help realize the full economic, environmental, and societal benefits of these vehicles.
  • NARUC supports policies that maintain the integrity of the utility system and design of innovative rate programs or incentives to maximize customer savings.
  • NARUC believes third-party providers of fueling and charging services that purchase power or fuel from a regulated public utility or other competitive energy supplier to provide to the public should not be considered public utilities and therefore not regulated as such.
  • NARUC supports a competitive AFV marketplace, where utility companies, businesses, governments, and third-party service providers are able to participate in the owning, leasing, operating, or maintenance of charging or fueling equipment.

The entire resolution can be found online here

C2ES and IEDC host workshop on PEVs and economic development

December 4, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia

PEVs help mitigate the effects of U.S. reliance on imported oil, and can help position the United States to compete in the global clean energy industry. With those facts in mind, the International Economic Development Council (IEDC), a Washington-based group that represents economic developers worldwide, asked C2ES to help put on a workshop that would bring PEV industry leaders and economic developers to the table in order to identify ways the two groups can collaborate on PEV deployment.

The workshop included nearly 40 participants and covered a broad array of topics on the PEV market as it relates to economic development. At the end of day, it was clear PEVs could play a notable role in spurring economic development for a variety of reasons (e.g., creating auto-related jobs,  and powering vehicles with domestic electricity to keep more money in the U.S. economy). It was also clear that more work between the PEV industry and the economic development community is necessary for cities, states, and regions to realize these benefits.

The workshop agenda can be viewed here

PEV Dialogue Group Responds to DOE Request for Public Comment

On August 28, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a request for public comment on the framing document for its EV Everywhere Grand Challenge. On October 29, 2012, the PEV Dialogue Group submitted comments, which are available for download at the bottom of this page. The Group believes EV Everywhere is highly ambitious, but appropriate initiative for DOE to undertake. Stakeholders look to leaders like DOE to set national priorities, especially those related to technology development and deployment. Through its network, including Clean Cities Coalitions and National Laboratories, the DOE has the expertise and resources necessary to take on our environmental and security challenges, especially those that require a long-term commitment.

The PEV Dialogue Group would like to help the U.S. Department of Energy to design and implement the EV Everywhere program in any way we can. The Group offers its expertise both collectively and individually to the EV Everywhere program if further questions arise.

Patience and policy needed on drive toward sustainability

I recently responded to a question on the National Journal blog, "What 's holding back electric cars?"

You can read more on the original blog post and other responses at the National Journal.

Here is my response:

PEV Deployment in the Northeast

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Deployment in the Northeast
A Market Overview and Literature Review

September 2012

by Charles Zhu and Nick Nigro

Download the full report (PDF)

C2ES wrote a comprehensive literature review on PEVs in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic States for the Transportation and Climate Initiative (TCI). Funded through a U.S. Department of Energy grant, the literature review is a comprehensive look at the opportunities and challenges for PEVs in these states relying on the latest research and market data.

Click here to download the report from Georgetown Climate Center’s website.

 

 

 

 

Charles Zhu
Nick Nigro
0

Eileen Claussen Comments on the Federal Government's New Fuel Economy Standards

Statement of Eileen Claussen
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

Aug. 28, 2012

This is a win all around - it saves consumers money, reduces dependence on foreign oil, and is the biggest step ever by the United States aimed at reducing carbon emissions.

While Congress remains utterly gridlocked on energy and climate issues, the Obama administration and the auto industry have proven that real progress is still possible.  Working together, they've crafted a common-sense solution that taps technological innovation to benefit both the economy and the environment. Credit also goes to the state of California, for paving the way, and to the regulatory flexibility afforded by the Clean Air Act.

This is a victory for climate protection, but only one of the major steps needed to dramatically reduce our carbon emissions. Next we must tackle emissions from power plants and other stationary sources. The climate benefits may not be as easy to see as lower prices at the pump, but are no less real.

Recent extreme weather and the worst drought in half a century illustrate the costly toll of increased warming. Climate change is no longer a prediction - it is here and now. As the costs become more pronounced, we will hopefully see the strong public support and political leadership needed to mobilize an effective across-the-board response.

For more information, view our Federal Vehicle Standards page.

Contact: Laura Rehrmann, 703-516-0621, rehrmannl@c2es.org
 

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