Business

Conservatives debate a carbon tax

The discussion of a carbon tax continues. Conservatives met recently in Washington, D.C., to debate the mertis of a carbon taxt at an event hosted by the R Street Institute and the Heartland Institute, featuring representatives with opposing viewpoints from four conservative think tanks.

A 2013 C2ES brief found that a carbon tax was one way to put a price on carbon emissions, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and raise significant revenue for the federal government. A tax starting at about $16 per ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) in 2014 and rising 4 percent over inflation per year would raise more than $1.1 trillion in the first 10 years, and more than $2.7 trillion over a 20-year period. This revenue could fund a wide range of things, including deficit reduction, a reduction in statutory corporate income tax rates from 35 percent to 28 percent (often cited as a goal by both conservatives and liberals), and research and development into low-emitting technology.  Importantly, such a carbon tax could also reduce CO2 emissions by 9.3 billion tons over 20 years.

Video: What BELC companies are saying about climate and energy

The Business Environmental Leadership Council (BELC) is the largest U.S.-based group of companies focused exclusively on advancing climate and energy solutions. The 33 members together represent over $2 trillion in revenue and 3 million employees, and span a diverse range of sectors including electric power, chemicals, manufacturing, high technology, financial services, metals and mining, oil and gas, and transportation. Since the Council's inception in 1998, BELC member companies have consistently demonstrated their commitment to taking action on climate and energy issues.

Watch the videos below to hear more about what BELC member companies are doing to address our nation's climate and energy problems.

 

Hewlett-Packard

Sustainability in HP’s operations
John Hinshaw, Executive VP, Technology and Operations, highlights how technology and initiatives can help HP and its customers succeed while taking care of the environment.
 

 

HP Project Moonshot
See how HP is defining disruption with the introduction of HP Moonshot.
 

 

Perspective by Eileen Claussen
Eileen Claussen, President of C2ES, describes how technologies such as HP’s Managed Print Services make business sense while also benefiting the planet.
 

 

HP Labs Net-Zero Energy Data Center
Cullen Bash, Interim Director, Sustainable Ecosystems Research Group, HP Labs, demonstrates that it's a reality to power data centers with renewable energy or micro grids.
 

 

University of Iowa: Information Technology Facility
With the help of HP Critical Facilities Services, the University of Iowa designed and built a LEED platinum-certified data center that combines business and environmental performance.

 

 

Johnson Controls, Inc.
 

Empire State Building Saves Millions with Energy Efficiency
One year after an innovative building retrofit project, the Empire State Building is ahead of plan and has exceeded its year one energy-efficiency guarantee by five percent, saving $2.4 million and establishing a commercial real estate model for reducing costs, maximizing return on investment, increasing real estate value, and protecting the environment.

 

 

NRG Energy
 

See What NRG is doing to move clean energy forward
Learn about NRG's commitment to providing a healthier energy future with wind, nuclear, solar and biomass, and its pioneering work making the EV movement a reality.

 

 

Shell
 

More Energy, Less CO2
Demand for energy is growing incredibly fast. Meeting it while limiting CO2 emissions is a global challenge. But the world can make choices now to help achieve this. One approach is to use more natural gas, the cleanest-burning fossil fuel, instead of coal. Another vital step is developing carbon capture and storage technology, which captures CO2 emissions emitted by power plants and industry and stores them safely underground. Out on the road, more efficient cars and low-carbon biofuels offer the most practical way to reduce vehicle emissions. Shell is working on all of these areas and using its expertise to help meet customer needs into the future.
 

 

Understanding Carbon Capture and Storage
Howard Herzog a senior research engineer from MIT explains what carbon capture and storage (CCS) is and why it has such a vital role in addressing energy and climate change.
 

 

Shell’s Quest Carbon Capture and Storage Project
Shell's proposed Carbon Capture and Storage Project, called Quest, will capture more than one million tonnes of CO2 per year from the Scotford Upgrader in Alberta, Canada and store it deep underground, beneath several layers of impermeable rock layers. The Quest Project will be the first CCS Project to be implemented at an oil sands upgrading operation.
 

 

Carbon capture storage: Innovative technology to meet the energy and climate change challenges
What is carbon capture and storage (CCS) and how important could it be to tackling climate change? Leading scientists, academics, environmentalists and business leaders discuss the need for CCS. The film features experts from Imperial College London, Stanford University, the Climate Institute, the Bellona Foundation and Shell.
 

 

Quest CCS Project: Reducing CO2 emissions from Shell's Athabasca Oil Sands Project
Carbon Capture and Storage technology, or CCS, has been identified as one of the most promising technologies to make a significant contribution to worldwide efforts to mitigate climate change by reducing emissions from large industrial facilities. Beginning in 2015, Shell's Carbon Capture and Storage Project, called Quest, will capture more than one million tonnes of CO2 per year from the Scotford Upgrader in Alberta, Canada and store it deep underground, beneath several layers of impermeable rock layers. The Quest Project will be the first CCS Project in the world to be implemented at an oil sands upgrading operation. View this short animation to find out how the Quest Project will use existing technologies used in the oil and gas industry for decades to: capture, transport and inject CO2 safely and permanently more than two km underground. 
 

 

Webinar: What is Climate Leadership? Examples and Lessons Learned in Supply Chain Management

Promoted in Energy Efficiency section: 
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Two 2013 Climate Leadership Award winners in the supply chain category will discuss how they set aggressive greenhouse gas reduction goals and how they are at the leading edge of managing GHGs in their organizational supply chains.Mike Ray, Vice President of Business Integration and Transformation, IBM Integrated Supply ChainAndy Renger, Supply Chain Manager, San Diego Gas & ElectricREGISTER FOR THE WEBINAR https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/606192074]

Two 2013 Climate Leadership Award winners in the supply chain category will discuss how they set aggressive greenhouse gas reduction goals and how they are at the leading edge of managing GHGs in their organizational supply chains.
Mike Ray, Vice President of Business Integration and Transformation, IBM Integrated Supply Chain
Andy Renger, Supply Chain Manager, San Diego Gas & Electric
REGISTER FOR THE WEBINAR https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/606192074

Climate Leadership Awards

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Fifteen organizations and two individuals have been honored with Climate Leadership Awards for their accomplishments in driving climate action and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The awards are given by EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership, with C2ES and two other nonprofits. Awardees come from a wide array of sectors, including finance, manufacturing, retail, technology, higher education and local government.
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The “Instability Ingredient” and Business Risk

Businesses have always had to predict and manage risks. Those risks include the potential impact of extreme weather such as floods, storms and drought on a company's supply chain, power supply, and property.

But now companies must find a way to factor in the "instability ingredient" -- climate change -- which is likely to make weather more unpredictable, extreme -- and costly -- in the future.

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Market Based Climate Mitigation Policies In Emerging Economies

Market Based Climate Mitigation Policies In Emerging Economies

December 2012

by Sara Moarif and Namrata Patodia Rastogi

Download the full report (PDF)

Press Release

Summary

Used by governments for decades, market-based policies are mechanisms to control environmental pollution at various leverage points. They work by changing relative prices – raising the cost of emissions-intensive activities and/or lowering the cost of lower-emitting alternatives – to provide producers and consumers with a financial incentive to adopt the latter. Policies that can be considered market-based include taxes and fees, subsidies, and the use of pollution control trading systems. Market-based policy instruments provide financial incentive to elicit specific behavior from entities responsible for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, whether consumers or producers.

This brief provides an overview of market-based policies aimed at reducing GHG emissions in several major emerging economies: Brazil, China, India, South Africa and South Korea. By implementing regulatory and marketbased policy instruments across their economies, these countries are seeking to promote cleaner technologies and behavior change while also promoting economic development and growth.

Sara Moarif
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Climate silence will cost the United States

I recently replied to ta question on the National Journal blog, "How is the absence of discussion about global warming going to affect our ability to do something about it?"

You can read more on the original blog post and other responses at the National Journal.

Here is my response:

Patience and policy needed on drive toward sustainability

I recently responded to a question on the National Journal blog, "What 's holding back electric cars?"

You can read more on the original blog post and other responses at the National Journal.

Here is my response:

Companies seeing impacts of climate change

At a time when the climate issue is being overshadowed in capitals around the world by economic concerns, some may be surprised that interest in climate change in both the investor and corporate communities remains strong. In a recent survey of the world’s 500 largest companies, 96 percent of the 379 responding said that climate change is dealt with at the senior executive or board level, while 78 percent have integrated climate change into their business strategies. In the same survey, 37 percent say the impacts of climate change are already affecting their operations, up sharply from just 10 percent two years ago.

To understand why, just look at the numbers.

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