Business

Efforts to limit aviation emissions advance at ICAO

The United Nations’ body that oversees civil aviation has reached an important milestone in international efforts to craft effective and equitable solutions to climate change from this fast-growing sector. And this success last week in Montreal should send a hopeful signal to other UN organizations as they grapple with the challenges of limiting greenhouse gas emissions.

At the 38th General Assembly of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), governments endorsed a comprehensive set of actions aimed at achieving an aspirational mid-term goal of zero carbon emissions growth for the aviation industry beginning in 2020. The October 4 accord brings together a number of measures being developed by ICAO, including: a certification requirement for a global CO2 efficiency standard for aircraft; support for an updated, more efficient air traffic control regime; continued development of sustainable biofuels; and updating national action plans laying out country strategies to reduce emissions.

Proud of what we've done, but there's still more to accomplish

When I founded a new nonprofit organization 15 years ago, the United States and the world urgently needed practical solutions to our energy and climate challenges. That need has only grown more urgent.

Earlier today, I announced my plans to step aside as the President of the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) once my successor is on board. As I look back, I find we have come a long way. That said, any honest assessment of our progress to date in addressing one of this century’s paramount challenges must conclude that we have much, much further to go.

When our organization, then named the Pew Center for Global Climate Change, first launched in 1998, 63 percent of the world’s electricity generation came from fossil fuels. Incredibly, that number is even higher today – 67 percent. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, the main driver of climate change, is also higher than it was then – in fact, at its highest level in more than 2 million years.

Scientists around the globe have just reaffirmed with greater certainty than ever that human activity is warming the planet and threatening to irreversibly alter our climate. Climate change is no longer a future possibility. It is a here-and-now reality. It’s leading to more frequent and intense heat waves, higher sea levels, and more severe droughts, wildfires, and downpours.

We at C2ES have believed from the start that the most effective, efficient way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and spur the innovation needed to achieve a low-carbon economy is to put a price on carbon. It’s a path that a growing number of countries, states, and even cities are taking.

Environmental Law Institute: President Obama’s Climate Action Plan in the Near Term: Expectations, Risks, and Opportunities

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Elliot Diringer joins Dan Utech of the Obama Administration and Jennifer Smokelin of Reed Smith LLP to discuss the president’s Climate Action Plan. They will identify possible shortcomings and areas of emphasis. The panelists will also share their concerns about how the plan will be implemented and their views on risks and opportunities for businesses.

Elliot Diringer joins Dan Utech of the Obama Administration and Jennifer Smokelin of Reed Smith LLP to discuss the president’s Climate Action Plan. They will identify possible shortcomings and areas of emphasis. The panelists will also share their concerns about how the plan will be implemented and their views on risks and opportunities for businesses.

Panelists

David W. Wagner, Associate, Reed Smith LLP (moderator)
Elliot Diringer, Executive Vice President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions
Jennifer A. Smokelin, Counsel, Reed Smith LLP
Dan Utech, Deputy Director for Energy and Climate Change, White House Domestic Policy Council

September 30, 2013
12:00 PM to 1:15 PM ET

Environmental Law Institute
2000 L Street NW, Suite 620
Washington, DC 20036

See a video of the ELI panel on Obama's Climate Action Plan.

Carbon Forum North America 2013

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L'Enfant Plaza Hotel. The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions is pleased to once again join Carbon Fortum, North America’s Sponsor, the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA), as the Program Sponsor, adding additional depth and breadth to the conference you cannot afford to miss.

Now in its third year, Carbon Forum North America has firmly established itself as the place to go to keep abreast of the latest thinking and developments in the North American carbon space—for policy wonks and market-players alike. Join policymakers, leading analysts, and practitioners for an in-depth look at some of the most critical topics in climate and energy – from forthcoming California-Quebec linking, the interaction between state programs and EPA action, progress on public private partnerships and climate finance, voluntary efforts among corporations, and the development of emissions trading systems around the world.

Center for Climate and Energy Solutions is pleased to once again join CFNA’s Sponsor, the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA), as the Program Sponsor, adding additional depth and breadth to the conference you cannot afford to miss.

Register now

Follow conference updates on Twitter @IETACFNA and #CFNA2013 and in our LinkedIn group

Business Resilience Webinar Series

 

C2ES is holding a series of free webinars from September-December 2013 to explore the case studies cited in our report, "Weathering the Storm: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change." To join us, click on the registration link for each webinar you wish to attend. Video and/or slides from each webinar will be posted shortly after its conclusion.

  • Building Business Resilience to Climate Change: Entergy
    September 11, Jeff Williams Director of Climate Consulting, Entergy.
    View slides here. Hear audio here.
  • Planning for Resilience
    September 25, Joe Casola, Staff Scientist and Director for Science and Impacts at C2ES.
    View slides here. See video here.
  • Building Business Resilience to Climate Change: Weyerhaeuser
    October 16, Sara Kendall, Vice President Corporate Affairs & Sustainability, Weyerhaeuser Company.
    View slides here. See video here.
  • Building Business Resilience to Climate Change: The Hartford
    October 30, Jay Bruns, Vice President for Public Policy, The Hartford.
    View slides here
    . See video here.
  • NEW: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change: American Water
    November 13, Dr. Mark LeChevallier, Director of Innovation & Environmental Stewardship, American Water.
    View slides here. See video here.
  • NEW: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change: Rio Tinto
    December 4, Sue Lacey, Principal, Climate and Energy, Rio Tinto.
    View slides here
    .

Clone of Weathering the Storm: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change

Businesses face growing threats from extreme weather and climate change: damage to facilities, loss of water or power supplies, higher costs, and disruption of supply and distribution chains.

In a major report, Weathering the Storm: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change, C2ES provides a detailed snapshot of the state of resilience planning among a cross-section of global companies and outlines steps companies can take to better assess and manage their growing climate risks.

Click above to see our infographic, with key takeaways

Click here to view the infograohic as a PDF

The report includes a comprehensive review of resilience practices among S&P Global 100 Index companies and detailed case studies of six companies in diverse sectors: American Water, Bayer, The Hartford Group, National Grid, Rio Tinto and Weyerhaeuser.  It also draws on input from a technical workshop with representatives of a wide range of industries.

Key Findings:

  • Ninety percent of S&P Global 100 Index companies identify extreme weather and climate change as current or future business risks.
  • Almost two-thirds (62 percent) say they are experiencing climate change impacts now, or expect to in the coming decade.
  • Companies are most concerned about the direct impacts of extreme weather on property, production and supplies, and indirect impacts on operational costs, such as higher prices for commodities or insurance.
  • Most companies are managing these risks through existing business continuity and emergency management plans. Only a few have used climate-specific tools to comprehensively assess risks.
  • Most companies (75 percent) also see new opportunities from a changing climate, including drought-resistant crops, storm-resistant building materials, and weather-related insurance products.

Recommendations:

  • Create a clearinghouse for reliable, up-to-date data and analytical tools. Companies need user-friendly, localized projections of climate changes and models that link projections to impacts that matter most.
  • Invest in public infrastructure resilience. Roads, bridges, ports, and other public resources used to transport goods and services to market must withstand extreme weather and climate impacts.
  • Consider resilience needs in regulation. Companies in regulated sectors, such as water, electricity, and insurance need regulators to be forward-looking and open to companies making the case for more spending
    s
    on resilience.
  • Set up voluntary, public-private partnerships.  Bring together government and business expertise to improve resilience planning.
 


 

Additional Resources:

 

C2ES would like to acknowledge Bank of America for its collaboration and generous financial support.

 

 

 

Business Resilience

Image: 
Text: 
Leading global companies see extreme weather and other climate change impacts as current or near-term business risks. “Weathering the Storm: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change,” takes a close look at the state of resilience planning among global companies.
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Bottom

Weathering the Storm: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change

Businesses face growing threats from extreme weather and climate change: damage to facilities, loss of water or power supplies, higher costs, and disruption of supply and distribution chains.

In a major report, Weathering the Storm: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change, C2ES provides a detailed snapshot of the state of resilience planning among a cross-section of global companies and outlines steps companies can take to better assess and manage their growing climate risks.

Click above to see our infographic, with key takeaways

Click here to view the infographic as a PDF

The report includes a comprehensive review of resilience practices among S&P Global 100 Index companies and detailed case studies of six companies in diverse sectors: American Water, Bayer, The Hartford Group, National Grid, Rio Tinto and Weyerhaeuser.  It also draws on input from a technical workshop with representatives of a wide range of industries.

Key Findings:

  • Ninety percent of S&P Global 100 Index companies identify extreme weather and climate change as current or future business risks.
  • Almost two-thirds (62 percent) say they are experiencing climate change impacts now, or expect to in the coming decade.
  • Companies are most concerned about the direct impacts of extreme weather on property, production and supplies, and indirect impacts on operational costs, such as higher prices for commodities or insurance.
  • Most companies are managing these risks through existing business continuity and emergency management plans. Only a few have used climate-specific tools to comprehensively assess risks.
  • Most companies (75 percent) also see new opportunities from a changing climate, including drought-resistant crops, storm-resistant building materials, and weather-related insurance products.

Recommendations:

  • Create a clearinghouse for reliable, up-to-date data and analytical tools. Companies need user-friendly, localized projections of climate changes and models that link projections to impacts that matter most.
  • Invest in public infrastructure resilience. Roads, bridges, ports, and other public resources used to transport goods and services to market must withstand extreme weather and climate impacts.
  • Consider resilience needs in regulation. Companies in regulated sectors, such as water, electricity, and insurance need regulators to be forward-looking and open to companies making the case for more spending on resilience.
  • Set up voluntary, public-private partnerships.  Bring together government and business expertise to improve resilience planning.

Additional Resources:

C2ES would like to acknowledge Bank of America for its collaboration and generous financial support.

 

Video of our July 17, 2013, launch event

Introduction and high-level discussion

Discussion on emerging business resilience practices

 

Video of our Sept. 23, 2013, event at Climate Week NYC

Opening Remarks

Discussion
Company Prespectives: Managing Climate Risk

 

Video of our Nov. 18, 2013, side event at the UN climate talks in Warsaw

 

Report Launch: Weathering the Storm: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change

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The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) releases a new report, "Weathering the Storm: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change," which explores the extent to which companies consider their vulnerabilities to a changing climate, and how those considerations may be incorporated into business planning and decision-making. C2ES President Eileen Claussen will lead a CEO-level conversation and Janet Peace, C2ES Vice President for Market and Business Strategies, will lead a discussion of individual case studies. 

Weathering the Storm: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change

July 17, 2013 | Washington, DC

Welcome
Eileen Claussen
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

Panel I: Extreme Weather and Climate Change: Growing Risks to Business

Jeffry E. Sterba
President & Chief Executive Officer, American Water

Thomas B. King
Executive Director & President, National Grid US

Moderated by:
Eileen Claussen
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

Panel II:  Emerging Business Practices in Building Resilience

Jeff Williams
Director of Climate Consulting, Entergy

Jay Bruns
Vice President for Public Policy, The Hartford

Jeffrey Hopkins
Policy Adviser, Economics & Environment, Rio Tinto

Sara Kendall
Vice President Corporate Affairs & Sustainability, Weyerhaeuser Company

Moderated by:
Janet Peace
Vice President for Market and Business Strategies, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions


Wrap-up 

Janet Peace
Vice President for Market and Business Strategies, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

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