Business

Bob Perciasepe's Statement on Clean Power Plan

Statement of Bob Perciasepe
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

August 2, 2015

On the release Monday of the final Clean Power Plan to reduce U.S. power plant emissions.

The administration is doing what science and the law demand, and it’s now up to the states. The smart ones will see this as an opportunity, not a threat – a chance to modernize their economies and energy infrastructure.

I know from my conversations with state leaders and utility CEOs that even those who may openly oppose the rules are thinking hard about how to meet them. And many are very interested in the types of incentive and market-based approaches EPA is encouraging. It behooves every state to sit down with stakeholders – mayors, consumers, businesses – and craft a plan that fits it best. States should take advantage of the opportunity to innovate and make their economies stronger and more sustainable.

The final plan will give states the time needed to craft strong plans and achieve interim targets, provide incentives to increase renewable power and help low-income communities improve energy efficiency, and encourage cost-effective, market-based approaches to reducing emissions.

Many states and businesses are already taking action and demonstrating leadership. Years from now I’m sure we’ll see this as a pivotal moment accelerating the clean energy transition that is already underway.

We’re coming to grips with the rising risks of climate change and laying the foundation for a low-carbon future. The quicker states put their heads together with utilities, businesses, and cities to figure out the smartest approaches, the sooner we’ll get there.

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To talk to a C2ES expert, contact: Laura Rehrmann, rehrmannl@c2es.org or 703-516-0621.

About C2ES: The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) is an independent, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization promoting strong policy and action to address our climate and energy challenges. Learn more at www.c2es.org.

Companies pledge climate action

Thirteen companies took a public stand for climate action at the White House today, pledging to reduce heat-trapping emissions, increase clean energy investments, improve efficiency, and support efforts to reach a global climate agreement this year in Paris.

Three companies making pledges – Alcoa, Bank of America, and General Motors – are members of the C2ES Business Environmental Leadership Council, a group of mostly Fortune 500 companies, representing a combined $2.3 trillion in revenue, that support climate policy solutions that will move us toward a low-carbon future.

These business leaders – and many more – recognize the reality of climate change and the necessity to act.

For instance, HP recently announced that it will power 100 percent of its Texas-based data centers with renewable energy, thanks to a 12-year agreement to buy power from a 112 MW wind farm in Texas, in partnership with SunEdison.

Dow has reduced 320 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions from its operations compared to 1990 levels, and announced that by 2020, its trajectory for absolute emissions from operations and purchased power will meet internationally recognized targets for a 2 degree Celcius maximum global temperature rise.

Bob Perciasepe's Statement on Business Act on Climate Pledge

Statement of Bob Perciasepe
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

July 27, 2015

On the White House announcement of business leaders committing to climate action and supporting efforts to reach a global climate agreement in December in Paris.

We applaud the companies that have come forward to pledge action to reduce heat-trapping emissions, increase clean energy investments, improve efficiency, and support efforts to reach a global climate agreement this year in Paris.

Climate change is posing rising environmental, social, economic, and security risks. Delayed action only means greater costs.

Business leaders get it. They see climate risks firsthand -- in damaged facilities, interrupted power and water supplies, disrupted supply and distribution chains, and impacts on their employees’ lives.

And the business community will be essential to mobilizing the technology, investment and innovation needed to transition to a low-carbon economy.      

Several of the companies making pledges today – Alcoa, Bank of America, and General Motors – are members of the C2ES Business Environmental Leadership Council that is committed to climate action.

Although businesses, cities, states and nations are working toward a more sustainable future, it will take a global effort to address a global threat. Paris is our best opportunity to get all the major economies on board a lasting agreement that strengthens the global effort and works to strengthen it over time.

Many nations, including the United States, China, and the European Union, have already announced their goals for reducing greenhouse gases. But the strength of any agreement will rest on the parties’ political will to implement it.

The strong support of business leaders for climate action, like that exhibited today, can only help to strengthen that will.

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To talk to a C2ES expert about business engagement on climate change, contact: Laura Rehrmann, rehrmannl@c2es.org or 703-516-0621

About C2ES: The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) is an independent, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization promoting strong policy and action to address our climate and energy challenges. Learn more at www.c2es.org.

Countries should assess climate risk the way they assess other security risks

National security leaders deal with deep uncertainty on a daily basis about everything from North Korea’s ability to produce a nuclear weapon to the location and timing of the next terrorist attack by non-state actors such as ISIS and al-Qaida. Security decision-makers don’t use uncertainty as an excuse to ignore security threats.

Borrowing a page from security analysts, a new report out today by renowned climate experts and high-level government advisors from China, India, the United Kingdom and the United States assesses the risks of climate change in the context of national and international security.

China’s provinces learn how to reduce emissions with trading

As many U.S. states start to think about ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions under the proposed Clean Power Plan, it’s eye-opening to see how Chinese provinces are taking many of the same first steps.

I recently joined state officials from Arizona and Michigan and a Georgetown University professor on a study tour of China’s climate policy and low-carbon technology use at the provincial level. In each city we visited -- Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu in Sichuan province, and Changsha in Hunan province -- our meetings with government officials, academics, and nongovernmental organizations had a common theme: Environmental issues are a serious challenge for China and greenhouse gases should be addressed along with other types of pollution.

It was very encouraging to hear national, provincial, and municipal leaders all agree that something has to be done to reduce China’s emissions. But they also agreed the country faces significant challenges in reaching its goal of peaking emissions no later than 2030.

Climate Leadership Awards Application Period is Open through September 25, 2015

Press Release
July 9, 2015
Contact Laura Rehrmann at rehrmannl@c2es.org, 703-516-0621

Climate Leadership Awards Application Period is Open through September 25, 2015

WASHINGTON -- Applications are now being accepted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2016 Climate Leadership Awards.

The prestigious awards program, now in its fifth year, recognizes outstanding voluntary actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and build resilience to climate change.

Leaders recognized represent a wide array of industries, including construction, finance, defense, transportation, retail, energy and technology, as well as local government, higher education, and individuals who are tackling climate challenges.

Past award winners include Bank of America; Caesars Entertainment; Cisco Systems; City of Austin; Ecolab; Ford Motor Company; Gap, Inc.; Hasbro, Inc.; IBM; SC Johnson; Staples, Inc.; The Clorox Company; Tiffany & Co.; and University of California, Irvine. 

Learn more about the 2016 Climate Leadership Awards HERE

Applications will be accepted through September 25, 2015, in the following categories:

·         Organizational Leadership Award
·         Individual Leadership Award
·         Supply Chain Leadership Award
·         Excellence in Greenhouse Gas Management (Goal Setting Certificate)
·         Excellence in Greenhouse Gas Management (Goal Achievement Award)
·         Innovative Partnerships Certificate

Winners of the 2016 awards will be honored at the Climate Leadership Conference, March 8-10 in Seattle.

Follow conference updates on Twitter  

The U.S. EPA co-sponsors the Climate Leadership Awards with the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) and The Climate Registry.

Questions about the awards? Email questions@climateleadershipawards.org.

See 2015 winners here.

What past winners are saying about EPA’s Climate Leadership Awards:

“The Climate Leadership Awards send a strong message that sustainability and financial prudence aren’t mutually exclusive. Climate-related performance is obviously critical — but it’s also clear that my award was about cutting costs and risks.” - Sam Brooks, Founder and Managing Director, ClearRock (formerly Director of the Energy Division, DC's Department of General Services)

“The CLA Innovative Partnership Award has provided the Climate Collaborative and the broader San Diego region with another validation that ongoing, close partnerships across sectors is fundamental in tackling a complex issue like climate change and protecting San Diego’s amazing quality of life.” - Brendan J. Reed, Environmental Sustainability Manager, San Diego Airport Authority

“We work with thousands of suppliers and we're proud to receive recognition for our work across our supply chain to build a mutual commitment around sustainable business practices.” - Amy Hargroves, Director of Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability, Sprint

“We believe that the external recognitions that we have received, including the EPA Climate Leadership Awards, help us attract, retain and engage our employees, customers and partners, and are validation that we are doing the right thing.” - David C. Robinson, General Counsel and Chair of The Hartford’s Environment Committee

About the Climate Leadership Awards:
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) co-sponsors the Climate Leadership Awards (CLA) with the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) and The Climate Registry, calling national attention to exemplary leadership in response to climate change. The CLAs recognize the outstanding voluntary work that organizations and individuals pursue in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and building resilience to climate change. 

Options for Mobilizing Clean Energy Finance

Options for Mobilizing Clean Energy Finance

June 2015

By Patrick Falwell

Download the brief (PDF)

Clean energy and energy efficiency technologies are decreasing in cost and demonstrating their reliability as they are deployed around the world. Financial institutions are becoming increasingly willing to offer traditional financial structures and terms for clean energy projects. At the same time, accelerated public and private investment in these technologies is needed to meet national and global greenhouse gas emission reduction targets.

Patrick Falwell
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Save money, help the environment with a solar power purchase agreement

We’re going solar!

Our middle-class, suburban family of five, with two children in college, two mortgages and a pile of other consumer debt, is getting a brand new, 7 kilowatt photovoltaic rooftop system worth roughly $31,000 – without us paying a penny out of pocket.

That’s right. We’re paying nothing upfront for the ability to generate up to one-third of the electricity our 1,500-square-foot split-foyer home would use in a typical month.

How’s that possible? With a power purchase agreement.

Smarter homes: comfortable, convenient and climate-friendly

States could go a long way toward meeting targets for reduced power plant emissions under the Clean Power Plan just by encouraging energy efficiency. One way to do that is to deploy more “intelligent efficiency” solutions at home. Interconnected systems and smart devices could not only help reduce energy use and climate-altering emissions, but also empower consumers to make money-saving choices.

More than 20 percent of U.S. greenhouse gases comes from the residential sector – where we use about 1.4 trillion kWh of electricity annually to power our heating and cooling systems, appliances and electronics. Although we pay for it all, a lot of that electricity is wasted. Tried-and-true solutions like weatherization and more efficient light bulbs will continue to be common sense solutions. But increasingly, homeowners, innovators, and policy makers are looking to leverage the average home’s 25 devices to reduce that waste.

Image courtesy U.S. Department of Energy

A homeowner installs a smart thermostat. Devices like this could be controlled though web platforms, along with water heaters, washing machines and LED bulbs with advanced controls.

Energy efficiency will play a key role in the Clean Power Plan

A new C2ES study outlines the significant role energy efficiency is expected to play in reducing carbon emissions from power plants under the proposed Clean Power Plan.

Energy efficiency can be an attractive way for states to meet the plan’s targets because, in addition to being relatively inexpensive to deploy on its own, energy efficiency reduces the need to build new, costly power plants in the future.

C2ES examined six economic modeling studies that project the likely impacts of the Clean Power Plan on the U.S. power mix and electricity prices. Despite starting with different assumptions, all of the studies project that energy efficiency will be the most used and least-cost option for states to implement the plan, and that overall electricity consumption will decline as a result.

The majority of the studies project either cost savings to power users under the Clean Power Plan or increases of less than $10 billion a year. That translates to less than $87 a year per household, or about 25 cents a day.

C2ES President Bob Perciasepe moderates a Solutions Forum panel with (l to r): Steve Harper, Global Director, Environment and Energy Policy, Intel Corporation; Alyssa Caddle, Principle Program Manager, Office of Sustainability, EMC; and Lars Kvale, Head of Business Development, APX Environmental Markets.

Our second Solutions Forum focused on how to spur more energy efficiency, especially through “intelligent efficiency” — a systems-based approach to energy management enabled through networked devices and sensors.

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