carbon tax

Pricing carbon - What are the options?

Judging from the climate policy debate in Washington, one might conclude that carbon pricing is only a concept, or something being tried in Europe.

But in fact, 10 U.S. states (California and the Northeast states in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative) have carbon trading programs. That means more than a quarter of the U.S. population lives in a state with a price on carbon. And a growing number of nations and provinces around the globe are turning to carbon pricing to cost-effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions and encourage energy innovation.

Over the years, C2ES has closely examined the many ways available to price carbon, including a cap-and-trade system, an emissions tax, and a clean energy standard with tradable credits.

A Carbon Tax in Broader U.S. Fiscal Reform: Design and Distributional Issues

A Carbon Tax in Broader U.S. Fiscal Reform: Design and Distributional Issues

May 2014

By Adele Morris and Aparna Mathur

Download the full report (PDF)

This report examines the issues and options for designing a carbon tax in the United States. Reviewing the rationales for a carbon tax in the context of broader fiscal reform, it explores design issues, environmental benefits and the options for using the resulting revenue.

 

This report examines the issues and options for designing a carbon tax in the United States. Reviewing the rationales for a carbon tax in the context of broader fiscal reform, it explores design issues, environmental benefits and the options for using the resulting revenue.
Adele Morris
Aparna Mathur
0

Conservatives debate a carbon tax

The discussion of a carbon tax continues. Conservatives met recently in Washington, D.C., to debate the mertis of a carbon taxt at an event hosted by the R Street Institute and the Heartland Institute, featuring representatives with opposing viewpoints from four conservative think tanks.

A 2013 C2ES brief found that a carbon tax was one way to put a price on carbon emissions, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and raise significant revenue for the federal government. A tax starting at about $16 per ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) in 2014 and rising 4 percent over inflation per year would raise more than $1.1 trillion in the first 10 years, and more than $2.7 trillion over a 20-year period. This revenue could fund a wide range of things, including deficit reduction, a reduction in statutory corporate income tax rates from 35 percent to 28 percent (often cited as a goal by both conservatives and liberals), and research and development into low-emitting technology.  Importantly, such a carbon tax could also reduce CO2 emissions by 9.3 billion tons over 20 years.

How should Washington address climate change?

I recently replied to a question on the National Journal blog: “How should Washington address climate change?"

You can ready other responses at the National Journal.

Here is my response: President Obama’s inaugural address placed climate change and clean energy where they truly belong – among the most profound challenges of our time.  Our progress in addressing them over the next four years depends on how vigorously the president works to translate words into action, and whether there’s any willingness in Congress to join him in the effort.

Manik Roy's Statement on Keeping a Carbon Tax on the Table

Statement of Manik Roy
Vice President of Strategic Outreach, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

December 6, 2012

“Closing the door now on a revenue-neutral carbon tax swap would be a mistake. Our country faces huge fiscal challenges and can’t afford to take options for meeting those challenges off the table.

"One option would be to reduce taxes on things we want more of, like hard work and investment, and pay for those tax reductions with a tax on something we want less of: pollution.

"A revenue-neutral carbon tax swap could be designed to boost the economy, protect working families, and safeguard the environment.”

Contact: Laura Rehrmann, 703-516-0621, rehrmannl@c2es.org

About C2ES
The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) is an independent nonprofit, nonpartisan organization promoting strong policy and action to address the twin challenges of energy and climate change. Launched in November 2011, C2ES is the successor to the Pew Center on Global Climate Change. Learn more at www.c2es.org.

We could find common ground on a carbon tax

I recently replied to a question on the National Journal blog, “Is Washington ready for a carbon tax?”

You can read other responses at the National Journal.

Here is my response: If we’re going to get serious about reducing the greenhouse gas emissions that are causing climate change, the most efficient and effective policy is to put a price on carbon.

Why we could see climate change action

I recently replied to a question on the National Journal blog, "Do the results of the 2012 election pave the way for Washington to achieve bipartisan energy and environment policies?"

You can read other responses at the National Journal.

Here is my response: In his victory speech, President Barack Obama called for an America “that isn’t threatened by the destructive power of a warming planet.” With mostly the same players who failed to pass any significant climate legislation returning to Washington, can we expect a different result?

Possibly -- and for two reasons.

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